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#1
dsl

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I just thought I would throw this question out there. I'm interested in some unique ideas about mapping flows (migration patterns). I want to do something a little different from the traditional arrow maps, where the arrow indicates direction and the size represents a count. Or perhaps a unique take on the arrow maps.

Anyone have some thoughts are examples they are willing to share?

Thank you!

David

#2
frax

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Maybe you can mention why you want that?
Hugo Ahlenius
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#3
Dennis McClendon

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I might look at having a bunch (a quiver?) of thin parallel arrows, so that each arrow represents 10,000 people or whatever.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#4
Matthew Hampton

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You could also try using standard-sized arrows with graduated circles depicting volume embedded on them (raw numbers could be presented in the middle of circle).

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#5
BioGeoMan

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Yes, arrows do get a bit old sometimes. Have you thought of using a symbology that represents what type of migration patterns you are showing? For example if you are showing bird migration patterns and volumes, show a bird with a "swoosh" behind it and adjust the size for volume and add the raw number as Matthew suggested. I imagine you could apply this to any type of migration patterns as long as you could find symbology that is adequate (not too complex); I would stick to silhouettes or something similar. I also like Dennis' idea of the quiver of arrows...nice!

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#6
dsl

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Frax - I'm not sure which "why?" so I'll respond to a couple :D . For one, the project manager doesn't like the traditional flow arrow maps. I think he has tried some in the past, and is now kind of bored. We will be trying to map interstate migration flows for Australia.

Thanks for the suggestions. Changing the symbology might be a good route to go.

Anyone experiment with multivariate arrows?

Thank you,
David

#7
frax

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dsl, I am asking since breaking conventions might reduce the power of communication of the map. Being radical/different/cool may make it harder to present the interstate migration flows that you are talking about. Being boring and presenting using established means often makes the message clearer for the audience.

A suggestion - one way to spice this up, if the audience is very familiar with the states and territories of Australia, would be to simplify it to boxes, and (some kind of) arrows between the boxes. To present the migration of people, one could also use "people" icons/symbols.
Hugo Ahlenius
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#8
heath b

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What about color coding each of the states and symbolizing migration with colored human silhouettes (maybe one figure represents 1000 people) that depict the state that the migration came from? Colored figures represent in-migration and a greyed-out figure would represent out-migration. It would easily show where in-migration comes from, but may be more difficult to show an outward flow.

#9
DaveB

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For movement you might look at how other media, genres, etc. deal with it.
For example, we're probably all familiar with cartoons and comics with their motion lines and such. So maybe icons, sized by numbers of people, or multiple icons of a fixed sized with each representing so many people, with some kind of motion lines to show movement from one place to another.
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#10
Hans van der Maarel

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Just throwing some visuals into the discussion.

Pulled some random numbers out of my hat and worked out 4 methods. 2 traditional, Dennis' quiver suggestion and a linear kleingeld.

Attached File  flow_patterns.jpg   228.13KB   203 downloads

Hate to say it, but I think it's hard to improve upon the traditional ways here... :unsure:
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#11
DaveB

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Just throwing some visuals into the discussion.

Pulled some random numbers out of my hat and worked out 4 methods. 2 traditional, Dennis' quiver suggestion and a linear kleingeld.

Hate to say it, but I think it's hard to improve upon the traditional ways here... :unsure:


Maybe a combination of 2 and 3, proportional lines with numbers?
Dave Barnes
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#12
Dennis McClendon

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Since there are only seven "territories" to consider with Australia, and the state shapes are relatively familiar to readers, I experimented a bit with putting the state shapes along the side and bottom of a 7x7 grid:

Posted Image
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#13
dsl

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Thanks for all the suggestions!

Frax - that is a great point. In the end audience is perhaps the most important thing, and if they can't make heads or
tails of the map then what good is it? I'll definitely bring that up when I talk to everyone.

Hans thank you for the samples.

Dennis that's an interesting example. It might even be simpler if it is broken up by single destinations...I'll keep it in mind.

I'm sure I'll be able to, but I'll post here whenever the final product is complete (or maybe some intermediary maps for criticisms/suggestions as everyone is always very helpful when it comes to that).

Thanks again,
David




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