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Geology of the Olympic Peninsula

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#1
razornole

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Hello all,

Had a slight break from my Nez Perce maps, so I took advantage of the time to work on some of my thesis maps. I'm studying the effects of hillslopes on trail erosion (geomorphology). My study sight is Olympic National Park because if its extreme diversity in all facets of science. As a cartographer, this is only one of many maps to come in my figures. That is why I have left off so many labels (they'll be covered in previous maps).
This is a generalized geologic map to help explain what I discuss in my thesis on the geology of the park. My study sites are delineated by watershed (again explained in other maps), and there will be a figure caption when I get to that point.
Is this communicative to you? I feel it is but I am prejudice.

Programs used are ArcMAP 9.2 and CS3.

kru

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"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#2
Adam Wilbert

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The map looks lovely! A couple of my impressions:

° Having the other maps I'm sure would help, but without them it took me a minute to notice the western-most study area, south of La Push. The two shades of pink don't visually separate as well as the green shades in the other areas.
° None of your study areas have any ice in them, but its in the legend. And there isn't much distinction between "white" and "pale white" anyway.
° Probably just my regional bias, but I like seeing Vancouver Island in Washington State maps. I understand if you want to leave it out for simplicity's sake, but I've found with some of my students that its often left out unintentionally because it doesn't exist in US data sets! So, I'll throw that wishy-washy observation out there too!

Adam Wilbert
CartoGaia.com & AdamWilbert.com
Lynda.com author of "Up and Running with ArcGIS"


#3
razornole

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The map looks lovely! A couple of my impressions:

° Having the other maps I'm sure would help, but without them it took me a minute to notice the western-most study area, south of La Push. The two shades of pink don't visually separate as well as the green shades in the other areas.
° None of your study areas have any ice in them, but its in the legend. And there isn't much distinction between "white" and "pale white" anyway.
° Probably just my regional bias, but I like seeing Vancouver Island in Washington State maps. I understand if you want to leave it out for simplicity's sake, but I've found with some of my students that its often left out unintentionally because it doesn't exist in US data sets! So, I'll throw that wishy-washy observation out there too!

Thanks for the comments,

The lovely Vancouver Island was left off by choice. The data are available on ned.usgs.gov. The Lillian Glacier/Ice does exist in my Grand Valley study area. It just doesn't have a very large spatial extent. Good to know about the South Coast Beach travelway. When you work on something for so long, you know exactly where things should be so I just oversaw that. I'll fiddle with the colors to try to make it pop more. I'll attach my sector coin map (when I get home) which will be on the facing page and breaks down the percentage of geologic units. It would be hard to miss the coast then. I just wanted this map so people can see the geology, and it will help explain my discussion of an accretionary wedge.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#4
DaveB

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Nice start and quite a change of pace from your Nez Perce maps. :)
I don't have a problem with the 2 shades of pink. I think the outline around the study areas and the other colors (especially the green) help to separate the study area from the rest of the map. What I'm wondering though is, concerning figure-ground, which stands out more, the study areas or the non-study areas... I'm not sure and maybe that's fine.
Is the data going to be clipped off or masked at the bottom edge where it currently hangs off of the blue background?
Dave Barnes
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#5
razornole

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Well as I mentioned early, this map is really a diptych. This map will be on the facing page. All of these maps will have an inch margin and also a figure caption to explain. Hence no title.
I didn't care too much about the figure ground, since this will accompany the other. I was really more concerned with showing how the geology relates to rest rest of the park/peninsula.

I will use a clipping mask on the bottom of the fist, however, some of it will hang over the edge. It is a technique that use on a lot of my thematic maps.

Hopefully this will help clarify.

kru
"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#6
razornole

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Would be nice to attach the map

kru

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"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD




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