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Elevation Map fron small area in Puerto Rico

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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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Hi Francisco, and welcome.

I like the terrain model you posted. It's a bit coarse, but the presentation is very cool. What data did you use for that?
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#2
frax

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Fransisco -- what is is that you want to communicate in that map... ?
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#3
franciscocartographer

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I introduced myself yesterday (Francisco from Arizona) and included an elevation and relief map ('RelievePendiente'). The area is about 500 acres and is located at the center of the island of Puerto Rico. The purpose of the graphic was to get an idea of the relief at a future nature preserve.

The top graphic of this map is a coarse (I used a 30 meter DEM) tridimensional view of the elevation (in meters).

At the lower right corner I included a shaded relief of the area around it with some important elevation points (peaks in meters).

The lower left graphic is a slope model with a color grading from red (higher slope) to green (lower).

I used ArcGIS extensions Spatial Analyst and 3-D analyst. The final graphic was done in Illustrator.

I have access to photoshop and freehand.

I am looking for some advice on the design, organization, and other techniques and data sources to create this type of map.

Thank you in advance!!
Attached File  RelievePendiente.gif   467.59KB   189 downloads
--------------------------------------
Francisco Jimenez, GISP
Senior GIS Analyst & Amateur Cartographer

My webpage

#4
Martin Gamache

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Francisco,


I am not sure what the context of this piece is, a stand alone panel or display, or a page in a book? There are some good ideas here in terms of information content but a lot of little changes that could be made to improve it.

A few comments:

Only your Slope map has a frame around it, I like the clean look of maps without frames, because of having less distracting lines but I think you should be consistent with your design elements. Your have a double colored frame on one, a drop shadow on your title box, two other maps and a mystery legend floating on the background. Iwould want to be more consistent with these details. If I was placing a frame around one map it would probably be the shaded relief locator map, but I think you could get away without any frames here.

Your title should tell us more about what we are looking at. It may be that this is one page in a larger publication but you dont tell us what the Reserve's name is anywhere here, not on the locator map, not in the text, not in the title. Looking at this map without more context either in the form of words or labels on the map or a small locator map this reserva could be anywhere in the Spanish speaking world. But again I dont know what the context of this piece is it may be obvious to the intended audience.

There is a legend for what appears to be your perspective map (TIN ) with triangles indicating slope but it is just floating there and the triangles are colored and it is not evident which of the map that legend applies to Since the other maps have a legend already.

Your color schemes are not necssarily appropriate or the best choice for this data, Especially the slope map where the scheme could be seen as diverging with a mid value of yellow between 15 & 18 degrees. Unless this is a critical or average value that needs to be highlighted I think it may be misleading. If it is you should mention it in your text and on the legend. The sprectrum palette you use for the elevation perspective map is also not the best choice, it works but I would probably try something using a sequential color scheme with a subtle hue change going from dark (low areas) to light (high areas). I would also label the boundary that is indicated on the map. Out of personal preference I dont like to use TINs for terrain maps. You may want to consider using your DEM in Arc Scene to generate a smoother looking terrain.

Both the Slope and Height map could use the addition of a few landmarks to help the reader identify what they are looking at. Since you are using both a plan view and a perspective view, this can be useful for the reader but you have to help them see the connections between the two. Your slope map looks very coarse, this is OK, a funtion of your data resolution, but you should tell us what that data is and the resolution of it and in this case it is even more important to have those landmarks.


Your shaded relief locator map could use a few improvements . I would make the scale bar and north arrow a little smaller and maybe use that space to put a locator map of Puerto Rico unless your audience is familiar with this area. I might use a more pictographic symbol for the mountain summits and I might increase the point size of the summit labels a little bit and make them darker as there is not much contrast between the labels and the grey background. I would add a label to the colored box so we know exacty what it is. I would also add some more information on this map, maybe the major rivers and some towns and roads that may be in the area. Right now there is not much context.

As far as your shaded relief it is a little bit too detailed (noisy) for your scale and could be tweaked subtely by some brightness/contrast adjustments and some smoothing.


mg

#5
franciscocartographer

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mg,

Thank you very much for the comments. It really makes a difference when other people are able to comment about one's maps. It is truly iluminating. Consistency, floating legend and text, color schemes, balance etc. are all things that take time to master and forums like this one are really a bessing.

This peace is a part of a series of maps, so there is a location maps and other maps.

I will use your comments to improve this and the other maps of these series.

I really appreciate your remarks.

francisco.
--------------------------------------
Francisco Jimenez, GISP
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#6
ELeFevre

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Fransico,
I'm a bit behind on the post, but here are a few comments that will hopefully be of some use.

I don't think you need a frame around any of the images as Martin suggested, but I do think something could be done to the edges of the shaded relief to unify it more with the background. Maybe a "1" point stroke around the image, or possibly adding a slight transparancy to the edge would do the trick. The irregular shape and perspective of the other two images allows them look somehow more in place than the shaded relief. It's difficult to create a harmonious layout when you have two irregular organic shaped objects with very few straight lines, combined with a single, large, rectangular one...

I would also move the scale bar on the shaded relief to the bottom of the image so the design elements are consistent and organized.

Very good work! Erin



#7
franciscocartographer

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Erin,

Thanks for the comments. Yes, the rectangular shape of the shaded relief disrupt the armony of the presentation. Your ideas are very informative.

Thanks again for sharing your knowledge and experience.!!
--------------------------------------
Francisco Jimenez, GISP
Senior GIS Analyst & Amateur Cartographer

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