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#1
Keith

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Hello

I was tasked displaying our global locations in a new way. We that that this would be a new twist on some of our older map formats

Let me know what you think we still have a few more tweaks

Thanks

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#2
BioGeoMan

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Very nice. I would only have a couple of minor suggestions:

  • Could you make the location symbols a more prevalent, higher contrast color such as red? The mute tone of the current symbols is a bit hard to distinguish when overlaid on the browner tones of the map (SW US).
  • Maybe distinguish between the foreground globes and background globe a bit more, they almost seem to mesh together (unless that was intended).
  • Don't know if you need to repeat the India and Saudi Arabia locations on two different globes.

That's it! Nice work!

Michael Scisco

BioGeoCreations
Albuquerque, NM

505-603-3636
biogeocreations.com


#3
eli

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Looks great! What sort of software did you use to create the globes?

#4
Adam Wilbert

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the globes look great. I'm not sure of their final use (web/print/other), but setting them against a black background would really make them pop! I'd also suggest some more dramatic shading, particularly where they all come together. Just minor quips though. Nice job!

Adam Wilbert
CartoGaia.com & AdamWilbert.com
Lynda.com author of "Up and Running with ArcGIS"


#5
Hans van der Maarel

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Cool! Certainly a novel idea.

There does seem to be a seam running through the Pacific Ocean (180 degrees line).
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#6
Keith

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We are still playing around with the backround and the site symblos.

Each of th globes were reprojected using Global mapper and then our sites were plotted using MaPublisher. The seam is were the orginal WGS 84 lat long projection is seamed together. We will need to do a little bit of photoshop work to remove that artifact.

Thanks for the feedback

#7
Jean-Louis

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Like all great ideas, it suddenly seems so obvious and makes me wonder why I,ve never seen it done this way before.
congratulations.
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#8
Dennis McClendon

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Something similar that I did a couple years ago:

Posted Image

We wanted to show the countries/cities represented at an international festival in Chicago.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#9
Rick Dey

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I like it, but taking a more minimalist approach, is it really necessary to go with 3 globes? Yes, I know it gives a very unique look but from the look of things you could have been able to get by with 2 and as a result been less confusing with the overlaps and area in the middle where they all blend together. Now if each of these is a different region in the company, then the 3 globes would make more sense.
Rick Dey

#10
Jean-Louis

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What I particularly like about Keiths design is how easily and naturally it could incorporate an even larger scale Europe. I wonder if something similar can be done with the frustratingly small New England states in representations of the US.
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#11
Dennis McClendon

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If you don't use three globes, some area ends up on the edge where it's hard to see. You generally need North America, Europe, and East Asia to all be clear enough to differentiate cities and countries. That's very hard to do with two globes. And two globes doesn't give the design interest or "tension" you get with three that extend outside the box.

I think it would seem odd to have one of the globes at larger scale than the others, to more clearly show Europe. In those situations, it's sometimes better to do three or four maps (as opposed to globes) at different scales, and use some clever graphic design device to integrate them. For instance, you could nest together four or five hexagons, each with a different map enclosed in it.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com




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