Jump to content

 
Photo

match polygon edges in ArcMAP

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1
razornole

razornole

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 452 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Ozark Plateau, Arkansas
  • Interests:Photography, Cartography, Down-river canoeing, Backpacking, Cross country biking, Geomorphology, Ornithology, Ecology, Quaternary, and last but first; drinking beer on the beach.
  • United States

I was wondering if there was an easy way to 'match' the edges of two different polygon layers, or borrow the edge of one polygon to define the edge of another. In this example, I have two different polygon layers, one that shows the edge of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington, USA (i.e. the water bodies and land the Red layer on the attachment), and another that show the 100s of geological units found on the Olympic Peninsula (the black layer).
I don't want to lose any of the table data associated with the geological layer, nor do I want to mess with the edges between the different geological layers inland. I just really want to force the water/land boundary of my geological data to match my raster/peninsula edge.

Any suggestions?

kru

Attached Files


"Ah, to see the world with the eyes of the gods is geography--to know cities and tribes, mountains and rivers, earth and sea, this is our gift."
Strabo 22AD

#2
mike

mike

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 320 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Toronto, ON
  • Canada

Hmm... looks messy, but this can be done using the Spatial Adjustment tool. You basically select one layer as target and the other as source. Create displacement links between the two layers and then adjust. Play around with the toolbar to see what you need to get done. Also, there is an option to preserve or map attributes between the layers. Take a look at the online help section.

#3
François Goulet

François Goulet

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 688 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Mille-Isles, Qc
  • Interests:Cartography, History, Graphic Design and almost everything else...
  • Canada

Hmm... looks messy, but this can be done using the Spatial Adjustment tool. You basically select one layer as target and the other as source. Create displacement links between the two layers and then adjust. Play around with the toolbar to see what you need to get done. Also, there is an option to preserve or map attributes between the layers. Take a look at the online help section.


The data is obviously from different scale so how many displacement link do you think it would take to re-create the irregular egdes of the land boundaries? I didn't know the Spatial Adjustment tool so I'm just wondering...

#4
wick

wick

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • United States

You might look at the "integrate" tool in ArcMap to see if that could help.
"Integrate Compares features and makes any lines, points, or vertices within a certain distance range identical or coincident."
Jesse Wickizer
Maps.com

#5
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,882 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Does it have to be in ArcMAP? The AnchoredSnapper in FME does exactly this. Put in 2 groups of features, one acts as the 'anchor' and the other gets snapped to that using a specified tolerance.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#6
chris thompson

chris thompson

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • United States

Reply to an older posting but what you want to do is precisely what topology is designed to control. If you're using an ArcView license of ArcGIS then you're limited to using what ESRI calls 'map topology' which will allow you to perform some limited topology based editing within an ArcMap document. In ArcMap go to your help and look for 'Map Topology' and that should give you the information you need.

#7
Unit Seven

Unit Seven

    Legendary Contributor

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 266 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:New Zealand
  • New Zealand

Hans—will the anchored snapper do the edges? I have used it a lot but always presummed it snapped nodes to nodes therefore it could leave slivers say if the parks had less detail (more generalised) than the coast.


Or I could have a quick look myself I guess.
S a m B r o w n

U N I T S E V E N
unit.seven@gmail.com

Miramar, Wellington
N E W Z E A L A N D

#8
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,882 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Hans—will the anchored snapper do the edges? I have used it a lot but always presummed it snapped nodes to nodes therefore it could leave slivers say if the parks had less detail (more generalised) than the coast.


It only snaps nodes to nodes if they fall within a specified distance of eachother, so if the differences between your 2 features are larger than that distance, you can end up with slivers. If one has more detail than the other, it sometimes helps if you add a Densifier in between (generating more nodes to play with)
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#9
Charlie Frye

Charlie Frye

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 112 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • Interests:Base map design/data model, political/election maps; use of historical maps for modern GIS analysis
  • United States

If you've only got a few polygons that need work, use the Editor. There are a couple of ways to get this done. The fussier way to do this is to use the Reshape task (select the polygon that needs t conform and reshape it by tracing the polygon that is correct). I say fussy because that approach requires some finesse.

Another much easier way to do it is cut the polygon that needs to be conform such all but a small portion of that polygon can be deleted. Then use the trace tool to trace a new polygon that does conform, and then merge it with the remnant. You will also need to trace against the remnant polygon. When you do the merge, specify that you want to keep the attributes from the remnant polygon. It takes a couple minutes to deal with half a dozen simple to moderately complex polygons. That's a lot less time than figuring out the geoprocessing and subsequent QA (to ensure no unintended consequences resulted).

Thus, this would work well to reshape the Olympic Peninsula, making it conform to the geologic polygons.

You could also union the two feature classes, and use the Editor to interactively merge polygons where the geology undershoots the shoreline, and select and delete where the geology overshoots the shoreline.
Charlie Frye
Chief Cartographer
Software Products Department
ESRI, Redlands, California

#10
Kalai Selvan

Kalai Selvan

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 159 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:India
  • Interests:Map Making & Map making
  • India

I understand that one huge polygon which surrounds the existing polygon boundary is not matching correct. if that is the CASE. We can create a new boundary and add all the attributes.
If there are many number of polygons, then again create that many polygons use just a common attribute, once this done we can do a spatial join of the table with the common field that we have attributed to the new polygon created.

Hope this makes some sense.
I have been cleaning this kind of mess for many geological maps, you need to have a lot of patience to do this cleansing.
hahahhaha.

Good luck..
GISGURU


If you've only got a few polygons that need work, use the Editor. There are a couple of ways to get this done. The fussier way to do this is to use the Reshape task (select the polygon that needs t conform and reshape it by tracing the polygon that is correct). I say fussy because that approach requires some finesse.

Another much easier way to do it is cut the polygon that needs to be conform such all but a small portion of that polygon can be deleted. Then use the trace tool to trace a new polygon that does conform, and then merge it with the remnant. You will also need to trace against the remnant polygon. When you do the merge, specify that you want to keep the attributes from the remnant polygon. It takes a couple minutes to deal with half a dozen simple to moderately complex polygons. That's a lot less time than figuring out the geoprocessing and subsequent QA (to ensure no unintended consequences resulted).

Thus, this would work well to reshape the Olympic Peninsula, making it conform to the geologic polygons.

You could also union the two feature classes, and use the Editor to interactively merge polygons where the geology undershoots the shoreline, and select and delete where the geology overshoots the shoreline.


Thanks and Regards
Kalai Selvan





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->