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#1
Nick Springer

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I have not used ArcMap for a lot of cartographic design work, but I have a project now which requires it.
  • In 9.2 can the symbology for a road layer be changed based on display scale?
  • I know a layer can be turned on or off, but can I make the lines thicker and thinner based on the zoom level?
  • Can I stop showing certain symbology values at different zoom levels (e.g. hide city streets)?
  • Or do I just have to duplicate the road data layer and symbolize each one for specific scale range and show and hide these duplicates as I zoom in and out?

Nick Springer

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Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#2
ELeFevre

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I have not used ArcMap for a lot of cartographic design work, but I have a project now which requires it.

  • In 9.2 can the symbology for a road layer be changed based on display scale?
  • I know a layer can be turned on or off, but can I make the lines thicker and thinner based on the zoom level?
  • Can I stop showing certain symbology values at different zoom levels (e.g. hide city streets)?
  • Or do I just have to duplicate the road data layer and symbolize each one for specific scale range and show and hide these duplicates as I zoom in and out?


I believe the symbology will scale if you set a reference scale in the data-frame properties. Right click the data frame (probably called "Layers" at the top) and look under the General tab. You will also need to open up the layer's properties (right click on the layer you want the reference scale to apply to) and check the "Scale symbols when a reference scale is set" checkbox under the Display tab. I hope this is what you are looking for.

You can set zoom levels under the General tab of the layer's properties.



#3
Charlie Frye

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Okay, first, you definitely don't want to be setting a reference scale.

The idea is that you will make a layer and symbolize it for a given scale range. For instance for roads:

  • Layer 1: larger than 1:10,000: Symbolize as you normally would.
  • Layer 2: 1:10,000 to 1:40,000: Copy Layer 1, change the scale range and make the symbols thinner (or whatever you deem necessary).
  • Layer 3: 1:40,000 to 1:80,000: Copy Layer 2, and maybe remove all the alleys, and ramps.
It's going to be a bit more complicated than that; I just wrote it that way to illustrate the method.

From the point of view of how to think about this process most effectively. Think just like you see a Google map; there is a complete map for each scale (ArcMap allows you to zoom to more than just the specified map layer scales in a Google Map), but it's the same idea from a map authoring perspective.

When I make one of these maps, I make a group layer for each map scale in the stack of maps I need for the total scale range. So there's a map that is for 1:1,000 to 1:5,000; then a map for 1:5,000 to 1:10,000; and another for 1:10,000 to 1:18,000, and so on. This allows me to visually test for continuity between scales as I zoom in and out. You can change the scale range at the group layer level, which allows you to fine tune your design.

When publishing such a map, the structure of the table of contents should change. So instead of a group layer for each scale, create a group layer for each type of data. For example a group layer for roads, hydro, buildings, etc. Copy each of your layers from the map scale group layers into the data type group layers (note: you will need to set the scale range for the layers on an individual layer level at this point).

The work my group at ESRI has done with Cindy Brewer at Penn. State and Babs Buttenfield at CU on Scale Master might be helpful. We published a blog entry on Mapping Center:

http://blogs.esri.co...calemaster.aspx

Everything you asked about, from a mapping requirements perspective is possible. You can also set scale ranges for label classes. The typical case is that while the symbols don't need to change, you may need to adjust your strategy for which features get labeled.

I'm curious, what's the nature of your project?

Thanks,
Charlie Frye
Chief Cartographer
Software Products Department
ESRI, Redlands, California

#4
Nick Springer

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Charlie,

That's what I suspected I would have to do. The group layers is a good tip.

Unfortunately I am not at liberty to give too many details of the project, but the maps will be served up dynamically via a web interface, from street level all the way out to the entire U.S. I have designed many dynamic map systems but they have always been proprietary software and design processes, so I am trying to adapt my usual process to ArcMap for the first time.

I actually spoke to Cindy briefly after her talk about the scale project during NACIS in Madison. It was very interesting to see an academic take on this subject since I have been doing it in the "wild" for so long.

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#5
ELeFevre

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Okay, first, you definitely don't want to be setting a reference scale.

Thanks,


Thanks for the clarification and setting me straight! Much appreciated.



#6
Nick Springer

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Can text halos be made partially transparent in ArcMap?

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Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#7
paul

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Can text halos be made partially transparent in ArcMap?


No out-of-the-box way that I know of to tease out halo transparency vs. text transparency. I think it's all or nothing in ArcMap. You could try converting the labels to geodatabase annotation, which does support transparency. Perhaps if you had one set of annotation with halos, and a duplicate set with no halos, you could layer the no-halo set on top and set transparency to zero, and put the set with halos below with 50% transparency.

Not exactly an elegant method, but it could work. Maybe someone else has a better solution.

#8
Casey Greene

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Can text halos be made partially transparent in ArcMap?


Nick,
This is something that I was trying to do a couple of years ago with Arc 9.1 and IMS, and i couldn't figure anything out :huh: . I think paul might be right - if you really want transparent halos you might have to use MacGyver tactics.

Attached File  macgyver.jpg   161.1KB   70 downloads

-Casey Greene
(cbgreene17@yahoo.com)
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#9
Hans van der Maarel

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Shouldn't that be ArcGuyver then? ;)
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#10
Casey Greene

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Shouldn't that be ArcGuyver then? ;)


Maybe ArcGuyver could square off against his arc-nemesis: "The Mapping Guru".

-Casey Greene
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--- sorry to go off topic nick ---
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#11
Casey Greene

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Back on topic nick,

I don't know if its possible, but you might be able to lay out some code, via ArcObjects, that will get you transparent halos.

-Casey Greene
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Casey Greene - Cartographer - Adventure Cycling Association
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#12
Darren Mayne

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I have not used ArcMap for a lot of cartographic
I believe the symbology will scale if you set a reference scale in the data-frame properties. Right click the data frame (probably called "Layers" at the top) and look under the General tab. You will also need to open up the layer's properties (right click on the layer you want the reference scale to apply to) and check the "Scale symbols when a reference scale is set" checkbox under the Display tab. I hope this is what you are looking for.

You can set zoom levels under the General tab of the layer's properties.


Thanks for posting this advice Nick. I have been chasing why the polylines and symbols on two identical maps looked different for the last 30 mins; turns out I had set a reference scale on the aberant map...

Cheers
Darren

#13
david17tym

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Transparent halos around text is possible in ArcGIS

Basically, you set masking options under "Advanced Drawing Options..."

I've used this technique a lot to mask contours from their values leaving background detail visible

If you have an ArcInfo level licence you can automate creating the masking polygons using the
"Feature Outline Mask" tool in the "Masking Tools" Toolbox

This creates a buffered polygon around your input features (gdb annotation layers included)

Dave

#14
ceicher

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Hi all

I concur with Dave.

You can do transparent text "halos" in ArcMap.

To do it, you need masks and not halos.

To make masks, you'll need geodatabase annotation.

You create masks with the Geoprocessing (aka ArcToolbox) tool "Feature Outline Masks".

Rough steps:

1. make sure you have text as geodatabase annotation. if necessary, convert labels to geodatabase annotation
2. create masks using Feature Outline Masks. input are annotation from 1. output is a polygon feature class
3. add the mask polygon feature class into your map. probably put it just below the annotation layer in your TOC.
4. change symbology of masks to have NO outline. adjust fill color?
5. adjust transparency for mask layer.

Voila... transparent text "halos".

If you want the mask polygons to also act as masks (graphically clipping other layers), then (as pointed out by Dave), use Advanced Drawing Options.

-Cory




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