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#1
nonie3234

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Bleh...I hate the color I used for the county boundary, but I can't find any other I like either.
Suggestions?

http://www.flickr.co...N00/2105414037/

#2
Dennis McClendon

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How about a magenta? Maybe C10 M90.

Or do a 1.5 pt dashed black line on top of a 3 pt no-dash yellow-orange line? However, that might require giving the county names a yellow halo to match.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#3
sitesatlas

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I like the colors you've used in general - very cheery. You already have a green fill color, so for the county borders you could try a brown (RGB 159-123-111), red (190-27-0), or even grey and the same or a darker shade for the county labels, IMHO.
Michael Borop
World Sites Atlas
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#4
nonie3234

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I jus tried the magenta - it seems too close to the red of the cities (M100, Y100) and the lighter pink of the territories near it.

I love the idea of a dashed line over a solid - I'll try that, but I need to choose other colors.
My interstates are 6pt black under a 2.5pt yellow.

How about a magenta? Maybe C10 M90.

Or do a 1.5 pt dashed black line on top of a 3 pt no-dash yellow-orange line? However, that might require giving the county names a yellow halo to match.



#5
Charles Syrett

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Bleh...I hate the color I used for the county boundary, but I can't find any other I like either.
Suggestions?

http://www.flickr.co...N00/2105414037/


I actually have no problem with the county boundary colour (or the colours generally) -- what hits me right away is the cylindrical projection. Is it lat-long? For anyone familiar with the area, this map may well look distorted, and shake reader confidence in the map. Was there a specific reason for using this projection?

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#6
nonie3234

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Oh, wow - that is very interesting!
I did not know that!
(I am not, in fact, familiar with this area.)

We have all our maps set at the same projection.
(although they tell me that will be changing in the future...)
The projection we use is "GCS North American 1983"


I actually have no problem with the county boundary colour (or the colours generally) -- what hits me right away is the cylindrical projection. Is it lat-long? For anyone familiar with the area, this map may well look distorted, and shake reader confidence in the map. Was there a specific reason for using this projection?

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com



#7
nonie3234

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BINGO!
Brown looks perfect, and I haven't used it very much on the map already, so it won't be confused for any other feature!

Whew! Thank you!
(You know how you look at a map too long, and you can't really "see" it anymore?)

Oh, and thank you for the compliment.
Chosing colors is the hardest part for me.


I like the colors you've used in general - very cheery. You already have a green fill color, so for the county borders you could try a brown (RGB 159-123-111), red (190-27-0), or even grey and the same or a darker shade for the county labels, IMHO.



#8
Charles Syrett

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Aha -- GCS is unprojected. The projection is called Plate Carree or "Lat-Long". Every unit of longitude is the same as every unit of longitude. Works just fine at the equator, but becomes more and more distorted the further north and south you go, and infinitely distorted at the poles.

If you're doing all of the USA, you may want to consider using something like Albers Equal Area, standard parallels 29.5 degrees and 45.5 degrees -- this is the projection most commonly used by the USGS, and used in the National Atlas. The downside (besides for the time in reprojecting, which may not be an option for you at this point) is that for regional maps you'll want to rotate the projection so that it looks "upright" in that area.

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Oh, wow - that is very interesting!
I did not know that!
(I am not, in fact, familiar with this area.)

We have all our maps set at the same projection.
(although they tell me that will be changing in the future...)
The projection we use is "GCS North American 1983"


I actually have no problem with the county boundary colour (or the colours generally) -- what hits me right away is the cylindrical projection. Is it lat-long? For anyone familiar with the area, this map may well look distorted, and shake reader confidence in the map. Was there a specific reason for using this projection?

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com



#9
nonie3234

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Yup - that is Egg-ZACK-ly why they are changing it.
When we have a radius ring around a site, depending on where that site is the "ring" can show up as an oval.
Our customers are perplexed!

We are getting SDE in the new year (the IT guys are all excited) and with that, we are moving to a more accurate projection.
Until then, thanks for the tip - I will see if I have Albers Equal Area available to me.


Aha -- GCS is unprojected. The projection is called Plate Carree or "Lat-Long". Every unit of longitude is the same as every unit of longitude. Works just fine at the equator, but becomes more and more distorted the further north and south you go, and infinitely distorted at the poles.

If you're doing all of the USA, you may want to consider using something like Albers Equal Area, standard parallels 29.5 degrees and 45.5 degrees -- this is the projection most commonly used by the USGS, and used in the National Atlas. The downside (besides for the time in reprojecting, which may not be an option for you at this point) is that for regional maps you'll want to rotate the projection so that it looks "upright" in that area.

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com



#10
natcase

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Aha -- GCS is unprojected. The projection is called Plate Carree or "Lat-Long". Every unit of longitude is the same as every unit of longitude. Works just fine at the equator, but becomes more and more distorted the further north and south you go, and infinitely distorted at the poles.

If you're doing all of the USA, you may want to consider using something like Albers Equal Area, standard parallels 29.5 degrees and 45.5 degrees -- this is the projection most commonly used by the USGS, and used in the National Atlas. The downside (besides for the time in reprojecting, which may not be an option for you at this point) is that for regional maps you'll want to rotate the projection so that it looks "upright" in that area.

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Yup - that is Egg-ZACK-ly why they are changing it.
When we have a radius ring around a site, depending on where that site is the "ring" can show up as an oval.
Our customers are perplexed!

We are getting SDE in the new year (the IT guys are all excited) and with that, we are moving to a more accurate projection.
Until then, thanks for the tip - I will see if I have Albers Equal Area available to me.

You might also consider (erm) Mercator. For areas this size you keep conformal shape, and the scale variation from north to south is pretty minimal. And you don't have to rotate, which might make your workflow work better.

Just don't use it for the whole eastern seaboard....

Nat Case
INCase, LLC

Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
maphead.blogspot.com



#11
nonie3234

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Thanks, I will!

You might also consider (erm) Mercator. For areas this size you keep conformal shape, and the scale variation from north to south is pretty minimal. And you don't have to rotate, which might make your workflow work better.

Just don't use it for the whole eastern seaboard....



#12
Dennis McClendon

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I have a number of metro-area basemaps that I maintain more or less independent of any specific client--Chicagoland, New York region, Southern California, Bay Area, DC area, D/FW Metroplex, and South Florida.

As I work on them, I'm gradually introducing horizontal control from GIS sources, by redrawing or fitting my linework to match the position of ugly linework in a GIS-generated background. (The theory is that GIS linework may be too ugly to use, but at this scale it's positionally quite accurate.) So far, I've chosen to use Mercator because it helps me keep section-line roads generally orthogonal and it makes it easy to add shaded relief by just fitting MacDEM files to lat-long lines.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#13
Casey Greene

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Hey, if you have a problem choosing colors in the future, check out one of these "color palette" websites. They can be a lifesaver when your completely stuck.

- www.colourlovers.com
- kuler.adobe.com

ps. nice map!
casey greene


BINGO!
Brown looks perfect, and I haven't used it very much on the map already, so it won't be confused for any other feature!

Whew! Thank you!
(You know how you look at a map too long, and you can't really "see" it anymore?)

Oh, and thank you for the compliment.
Chosing colors is the hardest part for me.


I like the colors you've used in general - very cheery. You already have a green fill color, so for the county borders you could try a brown (RGB 159-123-111), red (190-27-0), or even grey and the same or a darker shade for the county labels, IMHO.


Casey Greene - Cartographer - Adventure Cycling Association
- blog
- maps




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