Jump to content

 
Photo

First draft for review

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

I've just submitted a pdf proof of a new map to a client for review. Here's a thumbnail of the whole map: http://www.mapgraphi...s/Thumbnail.png (1.4 MB)

...and here's a zoom of part of it: http://www.mapgraphi...oads/Detail.png (2 MB)

The client has asked for an editable base map to create various map products showing different scenic routes etc. He wants a vegetation-based relief background and a basic network of map detail, along with National Parks, NMs, and NRAs.

We used a modified Tom Patterson approach to the relief background, inspired by his "Natural Earth" style. The challenge was to retain an attractive and intelligible relief background without being too distracting from the parks or the highway and city fabric of detail. Ultimately it will be the client who will decide whether this draft has succeeded, since he knows best what his priorities are!

Nevertheless -- feedback invited, however blunt. :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#2
Derek Tonn

Derek Tonn

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 455 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Springfield, Minnesota, USA
  • United States

Charles,

First and foremost, see if we can get people to look at the attached, optimized "Detail.png" instead....so that we can save about 80% of the bandwidth and download/display time in reviewing that image. B) You know me....always looking at imagery on-screen with a highly critical (though hopefully constructive) eye.

That said, I think my first reaction to that proof was very positive. The one thing that jumped out at me though was the placement of text labels. Personally, I would probably tighten-up the leading on multi-line text entries by about 15-20%. Grand Junction, Colorado Spring, Estes Park, etc. Those labels are taking up more "real estate" than they actually need to...and tightening up the leading a bit would serve to trick the eye into perceiving a bit less "clutter," I think.

The other thing that jumped out at me was that if a bit more time was spent placing those text labels as to ensure the absolute highest contrast and minimum number of times where those labels have to hide roads and other features, the better. Three particular examples would be Moab (UT), Fruita (CO) and Estes Park (CO). There is really no need to have those labels crossing highways and/or having lower contrast on that sample. A bit of minor shuffling of labels and iconography could make a nice difference related to increasing legibility.

Those were some initial thoughts I had. Hope that helps!

Derek

Attached Files


Derek Tonn
Founder and CEO
mapformation, LLC

datonn@mapformation.com
http://www.mapformation.com

#3
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,868 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Charles,

Looks very nice, although I'd have to agree with Derek re. shuffling type and symbology around a bit. Especially the symbol for Hovenweep NM... ;) (also, I was under the impression Four Corners was an NM too, but apparently it's not)

Green text on green background (e.g. Fort Union NM, Black Canyon of the Gunnison NM) is a bit difficult to read, maybe you can increase contrast there a bit.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#4
patdunlavey

patdunlavey

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 27 posts
  • United States

Nice map Charles! I agree with the other comments that type is an area that could be improved. We all know how difficult it is to get just the right composition of type on a heavily labeled map such as this one. When I'm at a loss as to how to approach a design problem, I happily copy ideas from the masters. In my opinion, the reigning American master of cartographic labelling is Dave Imus (full disclosure: Dave and I have collaborated on several maps). Order some of his maps from his website.
Pat Dunlavey
www.pdcarto.com

#5
CHART

CHART

    Chart

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 358 posts
  • No Country Selected

Charles,

Nice work.

I find that the '100%' black text stands out too much. I would suggest trying a lower percentage (dark gray) with maybe a small percentage of magenta. Same thing for the town symbols.

I notice 'exit' dots along the highway (e.g. 25). Not sure, but maybe the exit number could be added.

Also you might want to remove the dark park boundaries altogether and simply darken the park polygon. I tend to think that there is a lot of lines on the map already. (Not sure on this one ... but worth a try).

edit: good example of image compression from Derek.

Regards
Chart

#6
Kevin McManigal

Kevin McManigal

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 54 posts
  • Location:Missoula, MT
  • Interests:Climbing, kayaking, backpacking, biking, traveling, sking, mountaineering, guitar playing, laughing, and of course, map makking! (and all the other "ing's")
  • United States

Looks good Charles. What stands out to me are the black point symbols, especially the larger cities. They seem to float above the map on the zoomed in version. Maybe take them down a few points. Just a thought.
Cheers, Kevin
Kevin McManigal
Orange Peel Cartographic
MapPractical

#7
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,083 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

This is a part of the country where I've done lots of maps, and I can't find much of anything to criticize. That probably requires some sort of plaque or National Day of Thanksgiving. How about a week from today, if you're in the US? :D

I'd probably use a solid, small square rather than the hollow tree for small NMs and NPs. Aztec Ruins, for instance is on the northwest corner of the town of Aztec, not miles to the east. I'd try to make the green outline of NP areas more closely related in hue (not value or darkness) to the dark green for the type. I often use something like C100 M0 Y100 K20 for park type, then make the fill a quarter of that (C25 M0 Y25 K5) and the stroke half (C50 M0 Y50 K10). The idea is for them to all be the same color family.

Probably unnecessary for the interstate shields to have white strokes separating them from the roads. Not sure whether I'd use the interchange circles, as there are many other exits not shown and it would be extremely rare to have a highway junction with no interchange (there are only a half dozen of note in the entire US).

Teeny, tiny picky things:

Fillmore, UT has two Ls.
Tierra Amarilla, NM is on the east side of US 84, not the west.
Most of Denver's 470 loop should be shown as freeway.
Unlabeled highways through Estes Park, CO and Saguache, CO are potentially confusing, as is the placement of 24 south of Vail.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#8
ELeFevre

ELeFevre

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,049 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Louisville, Colorado USA
  • Interests:Cartography, musical instruments, reading, hiking, craft beer
  • United States

Charles,
This looks really great. nice work. I grew up in the area your showing so I'm probably being extra picky here. The issue I see is you are showing towns like Dinosaur Co. in the same way your showing Grand Junction Co. Dinosaur is essentially a gas station, a plaster dinosaur statue, and a few homes (maybe 350 residents at most) and no services. Grand Junction is the largest city in western Colorado. The two towns have very little in common. At the same time, Telluride is given less prominance than Dinosaur, and in terms of national/international tourism and recreation, Telluride is massive. Also, I don't think Mesa Verde extends into NM. The label could be moved a bit to make sure there is no confusion. Maybe you could filter the cities by population along with recreational importance and go from there?

You should also consider including the minor scenic byways if you can do it. An example is scenic byway 128 aka "The Prehistoric Hwy" that runs between Moab and Cisco Ut. along the Colorado River. It's one of the more popular (not to mention stunning) routes through that area. Scenic byways would be a great addition.

As a final comment I think you could drop the font size on the cities and towns and it would still be readable. Free up a little real-estate. All around very nice work.



#9
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

Ah yes, nothing like peer review. "The devil is in the details." Thanks to everyone who responded! I especially appreciate the corrections to factual content.

Have yet to hear back from the client though.... :unsure:

Dennis: I am in fact in the USA right now, and plan to celebrate Thanksgiving. It's nice to do it twice in a year -- once in Canada (October), once in the States (November). Too bad Christmas is on the same day in both countries! :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#10
James Hines

James Hines

    James Anthony Hines

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Centreville, Nova Scotia
  • Interests:Cartography, Philosophy, Politics, Psychology, Economics, Occultism, Spiritualism
  • Canada

- Some text is touching point locations in relation to another
- Green River (the text River is touching the line)
- Is Metropoliton text in Bold? It's very dominant
- Some point symbols are not located on the roads (eg. Salt Lake City)
- Some of the park symbols are located on the roads.

Overall a very good looking first proof; much better then my own in school. ;)

"There is much beauty that we fail to see through our own eyes teeming with life forms that give us that perception of our reality.  Leaves on the trees blowing gently in the wind, or scarily, the waves pounding through high surf, or lightly on a warm summer’s day; that opportunity to sit or swim in the water on a white beach.   That comfort to shout, “The universal conscious do you hear me?  I am alive, guide me dear logos towards the path of rightnesses.”  Earned what has been kept, no longer to be absorbed into a life filled with cold damn winds and  that stubborn fog clouding  my vision with nothing but darkness."


#11
natcase

natcase

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 571 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Interests:cartography
    aeshetics
    cartographic design
    John Bartholomew
    road maps
    large-scale mapping
  • United States

What everyone else said.
I do want to expand on/amplify one of Dennis's comments:

I'd probably use a solid, small square rather than the hollow tree for small NMs and NPs. Aztec Ruins, for instance is on the northwest corner of the town of Aztec, not miles to the east.

Point symbols tend to relate to their labels as if they were another piece of type. Not exactly like, but I find that if I use a rule of thumb like "one word space between symbol and label" or "visual (squint-your-eyes-and-make-them-go-out-of-focus) weight of the point symbol should approximate that of a bolded text character," I end up with a more harmonious map. I just need to remember to do invoke those rules to myself more often.

Nat Case
INCase, LLC

Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
maphead.blogspot.com



#12
MapMedia

MapMedia

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,029 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, California
  • United States

A little late through the starting gate, but I wanted to contribute to this excellent piece nonetheless.

Agree with prev comments and feel this is a very decent map.
A few observations:
1. NM/NP icons are not uniform - sometimes the boundary is used and sometimes the conifer tree icon.
-Using the boundary vs tree makes sense for large NP/NM, but I would keep this rule firm. Organ Pipe NM has boundary, but I felt it deserved an icon instead.
2. Is there a way to do away with leader arrow for Black Canyon of the Gunnison NP? Have you 3 line stacking there?
3. Sometimes I felt a word or letter casing would help where prominent labels overlapped highways.

Great work!! Thanks for posting.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->