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good neighborhoods to move to in portland

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#1
benbakelaar

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so if i was looking into moving to portland, what neighborhoods would people suggest to check out?

it seems there are about 90 or something?? http://www.movingtop...eighborhood.pdf

#2
Dennis McClendon

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I like Hawthorne and Hollywood, both old streetcar strips with nice mixes of restaurants, bars and bookstores.

If you want an up-and-coming neighborhood, you might investigate the area around Lloyd Center. A little higher up the income scale would be the Council Crest area and, of course, the Pearl District. Areas just south of downtown or west (Goose Hollow/around the ballpark) might also be worth investigation. The Northwest neighborhoods, along the Streetcar out toward Good Samaritan Hospital, while fun and well-served with shops and restaurants, have probably already passed the zenith of trendiness, with all that implies about real estate appreciation.

If you want more countryside, you might look at Orenco Station, a New Urbanist development out west on the Hillsboro MAX line. But to my mind, there's a lot of good Old Urbanism in the city.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#3
benbakelaar

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Thanks for the info Dennis! I ended up looking at Lloyd based on the home prices... for some reason, they seem to be the lowest in the whole city. I took a look on Wikipedia but it didn't say anything bad about Lloyd, other than that it is a revitalizing commercial district. But that could be OK, I'm not looking for suburbia... I'm looking for affordable :)

#4
Matthew Hampton

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Lloyd is a great area. NE Broadway (north of Lloyd) is a bustling commercial district that has connections into Olde Portlandia (Irvington neighborhood). You will find more affordable homes in North and NE Portland. Anything near Alberta street is hipster central (the "new" Pohemia).

Speaking generally, Eastsider's wear comfortably-worn clothes (or tragically-hip new clothes that look old) and predominantly ride bikes, while Westsider's drive new cars and wear new clothes. Eastsider's drink Stumptown coffee while Westsider's drink Starbucks. There is a great Portland Barbies spoof that came out awhile back that's pretty insightful. ;)

Portland and the surrounding areas are great. I lived in the city (variety of neighborhoods) for about 10 years, and have spent another 10 up on Mt Hood and in the countryside.

The housing market in Portland has been through double-digit appreciation for about 15 years so "affordable" is somewhat of a relative concept.

Speaking for all Oregonians...
we don't mind if you come and visit - just please don't stay!

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#5
ELeFevre

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Speaking for all Oregonians...
we don't mind if you come and visit - just please don't stay!


Good luck with that! It's only going to get worse!



#6
Sky Schemer

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Eastsider's drink Stumptown coffee while Westsider's drink Starbucks.


We used to drink Coffee People coffee...but then Starbucks bought them. :(

#7
benbakelaar

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Yea really :) And hey, all you "Oregonians" had to move there at some point. So I'm comin... possibly... :)

Speaking for all Oregonians...
we don't mind if you come and visit - just please don't stay!


Good luck with that! It's only going to get worse!



#8
Matthew Hampton

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That comment came from a famous speech our iconic Governor Tom McCall gave in 1971 to try and halt the California scourge. Unfortunately, it didn't work so well back then and some "trending" models depict a significant NW migration in the future.

I came to Oregon 20 years ago (from Missoula) so I am not a member of the SNOB's (Society of Native Oregon Born), however I do have a problem swallowing the population projections. We'll try and make room for you though...

Yea really :) And hey, all you "Oregonians" had to move there at some point. So I'm comin... possibly... :)

Speaking for all Oregonians...
we don't mind if you come and visit - just please don't stay!


Good luck with that! It's only going to get worse!


co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#9
pfyfield

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I've lived in Portland for 23(!) years now. All but three of those years have been in the close-in Southeast area. Very generally speaking, newcomers tend to settle on the eastside (Matt and the other Portlanders may disagree) while the westside has a more Old Portland feel. The eastside tends to be cheaper- you have to cross the river to get downtown, and the West Hills are a very pricey area. In my case, my sister moved out here to go to Reed College; I came to visit, liked it, and moved. I came from Connecticut, not California, so Tom McCall couldn't complain even if he had been still alive. Besides, I do a lot of volunteer cartography for the organization he co-founded, 1000 Friends of Oregon (www.friends.org).

If you want to learn about the changing land use patterns of eastside Portland neighborhoods as the dominant transportation technology shifted from the streetcar to the automoble using data derived from aerial photography you can read my master's thesis in the Portland State University library. I'm pretty sure it's not currently checked out.

You can't go wrong, frankly. Great restaurants, wine, beer. A great city for cycling. I wouldn't live anywhere else.
Paul Fyfield
Cartographer, Bureau of Land Management
Oregon State Office
Portland, Oregon
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#10
Matthew Hampton

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Hey Paul! Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh...

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#11
erik

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Housing Affordability is low and not getting better in PDX

The first chart on this page comparing income and housing prices is somewhat out of date (and I'm looking for an updated version of it myself):

http://www.ti.org/vaupdate52.html
(isn't the median house price now about $250-300K? and is not dropping like a rock as in other areas)

but gets at the basic problem for Portland and a number of other cities such as Missoula or Bend: the housing prices may seem low, but that's from the perspective of an outsider who is used to astronomical prices in some mega-urban areas. Those bigger mega-cities also have quite robust economies with plenty of high paying (and high tech) jobs. My sense is that Portland jobs do not pay anywhere near what the same work pays elsewhere, except for a couple companies such as Intel and Nike. But the bigger problem is that great numbers of job-titles that are big earners in Seattle, San Jose, or NYC are so few in PDX (and there's uber-crowds competing for them) that essentially they don't exist. For example, Java software engineer.

erik

#12
benbakelaar

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erik, wow, thanks for that info! i didn't realize that at all. i was thinking about living near Portland State University and eventually becoming a PTL or researcher at a center there.

the jobs i would currently qualify or apply for:
gis specialist
web application developer
website designer
research analyst
it manager
it specialist

i am going to look carefully at the salaries.. i didn't realize portland didn't have the same kind of economy as other urban/mega/cities, i heard there were lots of high tech jobs out there.

#13
pfyfield

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I'm not questioning the validity of the numbers on the website Erik links to, and I'm a big fan of Henry David Thoreau himself, but I can't help but wonder about an organization that "promotes the repeal of federal and state planning laws and the closure of state and local planning departments" and any information they present.

If you are considering a move to Portland or Oregon be aware that planning is a big issue here. The aforementioned Tom McCall, a former Republican Governor, was the driving force behind Senate Bill 100 in 1973, which established urban growth boundaries and other planning initiatives, very strong land use laws. I may not have all my facts straight but that's the gist of it.

These laws have protected farmland from sprawl and allowed the growth of the wine industry, the continued viability of farming as a profession, and other things that make Oregon stand out.

Recently Oregon's planning laws have been under attack by a ballot measure (Measure 37), which passed in the last election, under the guise of greater property rights. The general idea was that property owners should be compensated when land use laws devalue their property. Pretty soon claims started rolling in by those who don't want compensation, they just want to develop. These include large timber companies. One of these claims is inside the Newberry Crater National Monument. Here's a link: http://www.kgw.com/n...im.1d29e16.html

Now there is a ballot measure to reduce the large scale development while still allowing some flexibilty to landowners. Another link: http://yeson49.com/

I got into the Portland housing market before the huge increases and so I've benefited from the increase in property values. I also know several people who recently purchased homes. My son will be facing the same issues before too long. It can be done.
Paul Fyfield
Cartographer, Bureau of Land Management
Oregon State Office
Portland, Oregon
pfyfield@blm.gov

#14
Sky Schemer

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Recently Oregon's planning laws have been under attack by a ballot measure (Measure 37), which passed in the last election


Which is the only serious flaw with Oregon, IMHO. If you move here, you'll have to put up with an endless string of ballot measure initiatives, each seemingly more asinine than the last. Wevery election year it seems we are passing a ballot measure initiative for the sole purpose of fixing a previous one.

Whoever invented this process should be tarred and feathered. It was Scottish historian Sir Alex Fraser Tytler that said, "A democracy cannot exist as a permanent form of government. It can only exist until the voters discover that they can vote themselves largess of the public treasury."

#15
pfyfield

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No doubt the proliferation of ballot measures has become annoying. The intention is good, but about 15-20 years ago you started to see a lot of paid petitioners. Sometimes you'll be asked to sign a petition, and when you state your opposition to that cause, the petitioner will produce an opposing petition. Also every election you hear about fraudulent signatures and names being copied out of phone books. Personally I soured on the process back in the Oregon Citizens Alliance days, when the religious right got several anti-gay measures on the ballot. Thankfully none passed.

That being said, it's still a nice town. Honest.
Paul Fyfield
Cartographer, Bureau of Land Management
Oregon State Office
Portland, Oregon
pfyfield@blm.gov




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