Jump to content

 
Photo

software for isometric views

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,312 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Does anyone know how these isometric illustrations are created - what software could one use for this?

Posted Image
Posted Image
Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter

#2
rudy

rudy

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 744 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Canada

Reminds me of the impressive work of creating a cut-away drawing of a cruise ship - very labour intensive!! More mouth watering shots here.

#3
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

Looks like CAD to me. Have you ever used CAD?

Charles Syrett
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#4
frax

frax

    Hall of Fame

  • Associate Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,312 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Stockholm, Sweden
  • Interests:music, hiking, friends, nature, photography, traveling. and maps!
  • Sweden

Rudy, that link was gorgeous. Charles - I have never used CAD, and I know very little about it. I was thinking that SketchUp might be one avenue to approach this, if one doesn't do it straight up in Illy (the hard way).

Re: CAD - do people use it to draw things like this from scratch, without getting models to work with?
Hugo Ahlenius
Nordpil - custom maps and GIS
http://nordpil.com/
Twitter

#5
Charles Syrett

Charles Syrett

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 537 posts
  • Canada

I haven't used CAD very much, and I know there are other posters here who have -- but my limited experience has shown me that CAD "thinks" differently from illustration software. It *builds*, and then renders, rather than draws. If you start working with CAD as an artist, you may be looking at a steep learning curve, and you may be frustrated (for a while) at what may appear to be very limited drawing tools and capabilities. Yet obviously very eye-popping graphics can be done with CAD!

Charles Syrett
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#6
rudy

rudy

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 744 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Canada

With CAD it is easier than with a graphics package to do 3-D drawings, render them and spin them about until you find the right perspective. I believe the 3D capability is standard in CAD packages now.

#7
Sky Schemer

Sky Schemer

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Location:Hillsboro, OR
  • United States

I've done a small bit of modeling and rendering in CAD. As Charles points out, it would be a very frustrating experience to go from art illustration to CAD, since the latter is built around exact measurements and precision. Google Sketch-up (and whatever it was called before Google acquired it) is bridging that gap by offering many of the CAD capabilities without the need for exactness. There have been other products to do that for years, of course, but they have been cost-prohibitive (and get more expensive over time, not less, as seems to be the "rule of software"), where as Sketch-up is accessible to the casual user. CAD can be fun, but it is definitely its own animal.

When you add ray tracing and radiosity models to the rendering engine, you can get some amazing, photo-realistic effects. Attached are three images. The first is a daylight-rendering I did using AutoCAD and lit in Lightscape (back when Lightscape still existed and was an affordable product), showing proposed remodeling for our den which is now a home office space. Note that I modeled sunlight coming through the windows, but did not give the "outside" a color so it looks a little funny, but it was good enough to give us a feel for how the room would look. The second is a night-time/indoor-lighting rendering of the same space (a lot smaller...sorry). The last is a photo of the finished room from about the same angle, albeit taken during the day so the lighting was different from the render.

I don't have an opportunity to do this stuff often since I don't work in any CAD related field, but it's a fine hobby.

Attached Files



#8
MapMedia

MapMedia

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,029 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Davis, California
  • United States

Looks like Illustrator is a way to go, according to the tutorials at Khulsey

#9
CHART

CHART

    Chart

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 358 posts
  • No Country Selected

HotDoor has a few interesting plugins for Illustrator.

Hugo,
My guess is that the Illustration you are showing was done with the Cad and Perspective plugin tools and Illustrator.

Hotdoor
Chart

#10
Kalai Selvan

Kalai Selvan

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 159 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:India
  • Interests:Map Making & Map making
  • India

AutoCAD is the best for Iso Views, especially the piping..
Good luck


Reminds me of the impressive work of creating a cut-away drawing of a cruise ship - very labour intensive!! More mouth watering shots here.


Thanks and Regards
Kalai Selvan


#11
CGIS

CGIS

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Canada
  • Canada

AutoCAD fo rthe 3d modelling, 3DSMax for the rendering, and something like this for the vector output to lines:

http://www.cebasstat...amp;feature=890




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->