Jump to content

 
Photo

Clearview: the new highway font

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1
natcase

natcase

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 569 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Interests:cartography
    aeshetics
    cartographic design
    John Bartholomew
    road maps
    large-scale mapping
  • United States

Intersting article in the NY Times about Clearview, the new standard font for interstate highway signage.

What started as a project to organize information for tourist routes in Oregon would soon turn into an all-consuming quest, and one that marked the first time in the nation’s history that anyone attempted to apply systematically the principles of graphic design to the American highway.


Nat Case
INCase, LLC

Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
maphead.blogspot.com



#2
Derek Tonn

Derek Tonn

    Legendary Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 455 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Springfield, Minnesota, USA
  • United States

Very interesting. I have to say that I personally find Clearview to be a marked improvement over the former "Highway Gothic" standard. In particular, I think that the more efficient use of space and larger individual characters creates faster visual processing (AKA better signage). I love things like that....little, subtle improvements that most people never think about, yet will make their lives fractionally better/easier along the way. B)
Derek Tonn
Founder and CEO
mapformation, LLC

datonn@mapformation.com
http://www.mapformation.com

#3
Hans van der Maarel

Hans van der Maarel

    CartoTalk Editor-in-Chief

  • Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,835 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:The Netherlands
  • Interests:Cartography, GIS, history, popular science, music.
  • Netherlands

Very interesting. I have to say that I personally find Clearview to be a marked improvement over the former "Highway Gothic" standard. In particular, I think that the more efficient use of space and larger individual characters creates faster visual processing (AKA better signage). I love things like that....little, subtle improvements that most people never think about, yet will make their lives fractionally better/easier along the way. B)


The funny thing is that Highway Gothic, white on green, to me screams "America"... Interesting to see though that they did compare a lot of different typefaces (Univers, Helvetica, DIN1451 and so on) currently used for road signage, would have liked to see a more in-depth comparison between the various faces.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
Email: hans@redgeographics.com / Twitter: @redgeographics

#4
natcase

natcase

    Ultimate Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 569 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minneapolis, Minnesota
  • Interests:cartography
    aeshetics
    cartographic design
    John Bartholomew
    road maps
    large-scale mapping
  • United States

The funny thing is that Highway Gothic, white on green, to me screams "America"... Interesting to see though that they did compare a lot of different typefaces (Univers, Helvetica, DIN1451 and so on) currently used for road signage, would have liked to see a more in-depth comparison between the various faces.

That's be in the feature article in Typography today, not the article in the NY Times Magazine...
:rolleyes:

Nat Case
INCase, LLC

Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
maphead.blogspot.com



#5
Sky Schemer

Sky Schemer

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 119 posts
  • Location:Hillsboro, OR
  • United States

I applied the principals of Clearview to the signs I created for our garage sale this coming weekend. Really.

Alas, I don't have my own print shop so I had to make do with my crude, hand-drawn letters, but they still look great from a distance. I'll be sure to let you all know what our turnout is. ;)

#6
CHART

CHART

    Chart

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 358 posts
  • No Country Selected

Thanks for the post Nat.

I am curious...

Did anyone apply this font to maps as opposed to large signs?

Would be interesting to know if makes reading maps better for the end user.

I looked up www.clearviewhwy.com for pricing. Expensive, but it could worth it for map production. I did not find an Italic version. Also not sure why they have a negative (black) and a positive version (white) of the font?
Chart

#7
DaveB

DaveB

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,042 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Redlands, CA
  • United States

Also not sure why they have a negative (black) and a positive version (white) of the font?


For signs that have light backgrounds like white or yellow? For use on paper? I wonder, are the 2 versions different in any way other than color, such as widths, counter size, shape, etc. If so, maybe they are optimized for the "halo"-ing effect for light text on dark backgrounds vs. dark text on light backgrounds.

Interesting article.

Go Penn State! :)
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#8
CHART

CHART

    Chart

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 358 posts
  • No Country Selected

For those interested there is a similar font available at

http://www.triskele....roadgeek-fonts/

The font is for non commercial use. So it is good for testing purposes.

I took this link off http://freegeographytools.com/

Regards,
Chart

#9
Casey Greene

Casey Greene

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:missoula montana
  • United States

I guess the real question here is that of readability...The researchers say Clearview reads, well, clearer when driving. To me though, it just dosn't look as good.
Casey Greene - Cartographer - Adventure Cycling Association
- blog
- maps

#10
BioGeoMan

BioGeoMan

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 188 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Albuquerque, NM
  • United States

My two cents...they could have adjusted the kerning. The words look a bit crowded at first glance, but definitely an easier read than the previous font.

Michael Scisco

BioGeoCreations
Albuquerque, NM

505-603-3636
biogeocreations.com


#11
Casey Greene

Casey Greene

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 133 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:missoula montana
  • United States

I just stumbled upon a nice little audio cut from "Studio 360" about highway signs and the new font. You can find it here
Casey Greene - Cartographer - Adventure Cycling Association
- blog
- maps

#12
Spaniard

Spaniard

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • No Country Selected

I read an article about it quite some time ago that suggested the testing was pretty limited, and performed only by the makers of the font.

The fact that it performs so terribly when used outside of signage may be a testament to its suitability on the road.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->