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U.S. general laments Google Earth capability

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#1
benbakelaar

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This would probably be a great topic to put in CartoBlog... maybe if people comment here, some of the writers can pull together an article.

http://news.zdnet.co...1...d&subj=zdnn

U.S. general laments Google Earth capability

The head of U.S. Air Force intelligence and surveillance on Thursday said data available commercially through online mapping software such as Google Earth posed a danger to security but could not be rolled back.

#2
Hans van der Maarel

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This would probably be a great topic to put in CartoBlog... maybe if people comment here, some of the writers can pull together an article.

http://news.zdnet.co...1...d&subj=zdnn

U.S. general laments Google Earth capability

The head of U.S. Air Force intelligence and surveillance on Thursday said data available commercially through online mapping software such as Google Earth posed a danger to security but could not be rolled back.


Oh boo hoo...

Pretty much all information that can be seen in Google Earth and Map that's potentially 'sensitive' can also be accessed through other sources (free or cheap). Either by looking at maps that are available to the general public, or by taking a peek at the location itself. There's been complaints about this pretty much since day one. Rich people, sunbathing people, now the military...

Interestingly enough, a lot of military locations in The Netherlands have been obscured... The company that did the photography over here was ordered to do so by the department of defense (mind you, only Dutch bases/vessels, a Royal Navy frigate visiting Amsterdam is clearly visible)
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#3
benbakelaar

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What I thought was particularly impressive/noteworthy about the article was that the military guy was not railing against satellite imagery so much as acknowledging that it was out there and "could not be rolled back", so the military is switching tactics to concealment, camouflage, etc.

But of course you are right Hans, the image are being doctored anyway. I think everyone is starting to realize that in our new world of digital information, multiple strategies are necessary to accomplish anything.

#4
Hans van der Maarel

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What I thought was particularly impressive/noteworthy about the article was that the military guy was not railing against satellite imagery so much as acknowledging that it was out there and "could not be rolled back", so the military is switching tactics to concealment, camouflage, etc.


A good army would be doing that anyway...

Google Earth might be useful from a strategic point of view, but it's pretty much useless on the tactical level. Anyway, times are changing, also for the military. The cold war ended 15-20 years ago, armies have to reinvent themselves and adapt to new technologies as well.
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#5
TerraServer

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Interestingly enough, a lot of military locations in The Netherlands have been obscured... The company that did the photography over here was ordered to do so by the department of defense (mind you, only Dutch bases/vessels, a Royal Navy frigate visiting Amsterdam is clearly visible)


The U.S. did the same thing following 9/11. Many of the commercially available images of the Washington DC area in the few years following 2001 have the roof of the White House and other government buildings boxed out so that you can't see where the secret service observation posts, points of entry, etc. are. I'm not actually sure whether that was something that the government asked for or the companies just did it themselves.

Israel also has a rule about imagery having to be under a certain limit in terms of resolution. I can't remember off the top of my head, but it is either 1 meter or 2 meters.

#6
MapMedia

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I would say that technology is driven by military needs, not responsive to it.
But if you are worried about GE being a security risk, then Google StreetView must really have Homeland Security uptight.




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