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Imhof's Cartographic Relief Presentation available from ESRI Press


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#1
Charlie Frye

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ESRI Press has now made Imhof's Cartographic Relief Representation available. The price is $59.95 (U.S.), and starts shipping at the end of the month.

Here's the write-up we have on our website:

The renowned Swiss cartographer, Eduard Imhof, devoted his career to raising the standards of map design. In 1965, his breakthrough book published in German, Kartographische Gelandedarstellung, filled a huge void in cartographic instruction. The book was translated into English in 1982 as Cartographic Relief Presentation, expanding its influence and reasserting Imhof's mission to improve the precision and readability of maps. Cartographic Relief Presentation was an expensive book with a limited press run that made it a rare find in recent years. Now, ESRI Press has reissued Eduard Imhof's masterpiece as an affordable volume for mapping professionals, scholars, scientists, students, and anyone interested in cartography. This new edition of Cartographic Relief Presentation was edited for clarity and consistency but preserves Imhof's insightful commentary and analytical style. Color maps, aerial photographs, and instructive illustrations are faithfully reproduced. The book offers guidelines for properly rendering terrain in maps of all types and scales, whether drawn by traditional means or with the aid of a computer. Cartographic Relief Presentation was among the essential mapping and graphical design books of the twentieth century. Its continuing relevance for the twenty-first century is assured with this publication.
Charlie Frye
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#2
Martin Gamache

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Charlie

I thought the release date was early June...I was planning a party!!!

#3
Hans van der Maarel

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Charlie

I thought the release date was early June...I was planning a party!!!


I had ordered my copy through Amazon.com and just got a message from them earlier this week that shipping will be delayed to somewhere in August :(
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#4
Martin Gamache

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Same here, it had been suppose to arrive today!!!

#5
DaveB

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I am eagerly awaiting this, too. :D
Dave Barnes
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#6
Charlie Frye

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I had ordered my copy through Amazon.com and just got a message from them earlier this week that shipping will be delayed to somewhere in August


I checked with the ESRI Press folks and learned that there is indeed a shipping problem and August is apparently a more realistic timeframe.

Sigh.
Charlie Frye
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ESRI, Redlands, California

#7
Charlie Frye

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Then I just checked and found we will have them in the ESRI store at the Users Conference next week in San Diego, so if any of you are heading our way next week, you can get a copy then.
Charlie Frye
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ESRI, Redlands, California

#8
Matthew Hampton

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Way to go ESRI Press!

I think I might buy the softcover just because it's such a great deal. When I checked at Amazon and they have it (pre-order) for $37.77.

It's worth way more.

Is Imhof going to be at ESRI's User Conference signing books? ;)

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#9
mike

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Then I just checked and found we will have them in the ESRI store at the Users Conference next week in San Diego, so if any of you are heading our way next week, you can get a copy then.


Yes, Charlie is right, the book will be on sale at UC next week! I have seen the final product and it looks great. Our designer Jennifer Galloway did a great job trying to be faithful to the original design. Our copyeditor did a wonderful job trying to make it sound right. I hope everybody will enjoy the book.

I will be in the Spatial Outlet (book store) most of the week, so drop by and say hello. ESRI Press has 11 new books out this year.

See you all at UC.

#10
Martin Gamache

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So is this a different translation than H.J. Steward's 1982 version?

#11
mike

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So is this a different translation than H.J. Steward's 1982 version?


It is the same translation from 1982, but with careful revisions and copyedits to it. After reading the original translation, this is much improved.

#12
Matthew Hampton

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Does it include the separate color plates like Steward's 1982 or are they integrated into the book?

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#13
mike

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Does it include the separate color plates like Steward's 1982 or are they integrated into the book?


To keep the same look as the previous version, the book is in black and white. The color plates are at the end of the book after the index.

#14
Hans van der Maarel

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I just received my copy, had a quick look through it and it looks great. I'm looking forward to reading it in detail. Kudos and thanks to the people at ESRI for making this available!
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#15
GoldeneAdler

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I wonder if they have also made a new copy for the germans in the german language?

Anyway, it sounds like I may also get a copy later next month, after some sorting out of current things.

Another note, is it not amazing, how one man, with his knowledge, places it onto paper, and so, so many years later, it is still valuable in our mapping field, and by chance it was a germanic european man, and not an american, british, or another mapper from another country.

Off this topic, I have also recently had a friendly talk with some christian people, about Galileo, and how he went against religion, and followed his scientific values to proove that the earth was round and not flat as religion at the time had stated.
Can anyone give some input on this question: Was Galileo the scientist also very religious at the same time, or was he a simple man, simple scientist who could see reality at the time?

Interesting isn't it, how it is always the people with an open mind that if they are not careful of how they give their accurate calculations and information to the world, filled with religion, can get themselves into so much danger, even if they are in the right and correct with what they say.

Science is really amazing at times, even wondrous, and in a strange way, us cartographers in the past, have helped so many to be able to discover so much.
To solve problems is like solving puzzles to a child




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