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What is this effect called?

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#16
Unit Seven

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Turing out to be a good example of how many ways there are to skin a map...

I'm still going with Illustrator/Photoshop Inner Glow for this and by the sound what Karas is after — softer etc. As a few others have said the performance drops once you apply an effect like this in a vector package so for that reason would go with creating in Photoshop and placing as a raster image in the map—may have to add the hydro and some other linework to the raster though if you want the tints to affect them.

Was interesting to hear the GIS solution of colouring pixels based on their distance from the border though, something I wouldn't of thought of and would be interested in trying sometime.

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#17
ELeFevre

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Another "Illustrator/Photoshop" angle is to select/copy the vector work in Illustrator and paste it directly into Photoshop as a Smart Object, Path or Shape. Apply your effect and save the file. I love applying these types of effects in Photoshop because any changes you make are instantly updated in Illustrator as long the file is linked. You only place the file once.



#18
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Erin, what would the advantage be to do it in Photoshop, rather than just rasterizing the effect in Illy?
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#19
CHART

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Sara,

Back in the old days we called that effect a Vignette (e.g. coastal vignette).

There are a few doc, pdf on the subject if you search for Cartography Vignette on Google.
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#20
byzantium

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There is more computation involved to keep something like that as a live effect in AI, vs. just maintaining it as a linked image. So with the inner glow or other AI effect you would likely see some extra delays every time you zoom in or out, or do other things in Illustrator. AI is plenty fast displaying linked images as part of your document, up to a certain size of image. If your linked image gets huge (as in 20000 pixels across), then slowdowns may occur as well from AI having to dedicate a lot of memory to the image.

bb

#21
ELeFevre

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Erin, what would the advantage be to do it in Photoshop, rather than just rasterizing the effect in Illy?



There is more computation involved to keep something like that as a live effect in AI, vs. just maintaining it as a linked image. So with the inner glow or other AI effect you would likely see some extra delays every time you zoom in or out, or do other things in Illustrator. AI is plenty fast displaying linked images as part of your document, up to a certain size of image. If your linked image gets huge (as in 20000 pixels across), then slowdowns may occur as well from AI having to dedicate a lot of memory to the image.

bb


In addtion to Byzantium's comments, effects are typcially added at the end of the project, and by that point, you're working with a large complex file that's taken weeks or months to build. Adding a live effect at that point is just asking for unnecessary trouble IMO. That's why I use Photoshop. It's a matter of doing everything possible to keep the file light and stable from beginning to end. I've noticed that if a file is starting to corrupt, or I'm having printing errors, random system crashes, whatever, the problem can usually be attributed to an Illustrator effect of some kind.



#22
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Erin, what would the advantage be to do it in Photoshop, rather than just rasterizing the effect in Illy?



There is more computation involved to keep something like that as a live effect in AI, vs. just maintaining it as a linked image. So with the inner glow or other AI effect you would likely see some extra delays every time you zoom in or out, or do other things in Illustrator. AI is plenty fast displaying linked images as part of your document, up to a certain size of image. If your linked image gets huge (as in 20000 pixels across), then slowdowns may occur as well from AI having to dedicate a lot of memory to the image.

bb


In addtion to Byzantium's comments, effects are typcially added at the end of the project, and by that point, you're working with a large complex file that's taken weeks or months to build. Adding a live effect at that point is just asking for unnecessary trouble IMO. That's why I use Photoshop. It's a matter of doing everything possible to keep the file light and stable from beginning to end. I've noticed that if a file is starting to corrupt, or I'm having printing errors, random system crashes, whatever, the problem can usually be attributed to an Illustrator effect of some kind.


Another reason is that Illustrtaors raster effect were notorious for failing to print correctly and often had to be rebuilt by the prepress folks when getting them offset printed. This often resulted in very high "surprise" costs. My experience is that raster effect built in photoshop tend to print easier and cause less headaches.

m




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