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ArcWatch April 07 article

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#1
ELeFevre

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I'm sure many of you have already read this, but just in case you haven't: ArcWatch April 07 "Geography Prospers from GIS"

I found this paragraph interesting:

"Today, GIS and the broader domain of geospatial technology have become so important that many geographers wonder if the train hasn't already left the station—whether in the long term a small discipline like geography, which in the United States is virtually unknown outside a small number of universities, can continue to claim this rapidly growing monster as its own. GIS courses are now offered in programs in surveying, civil engineering, computer science, anthropology, environmental science, and many other fields, particularly on campuses with no department of geography. Nevertheless, according to recent estimates, more than 50 percent of all GIS courses are still offered through departments of geography and geographers make up a healthy percentage of the global community of GIScience researchers".

Questions that come to mind:
The article talks about the academic exodus from Geography in 40's by Harvard, Columbia, et cetera. If if it wasn't for GIS would have "Harvard Returned to Geography"? When I read that I keep thinking that GIS has somehow legitimized, validated, or perhaps organized Geography (geographical principles and techniques) into something the professional/academic world can apply directly to concrete problems. I'm not expressing myself very well, but most of you will know what I'm trying to get at, so help me out if you can. Any thoughts?



#2
MapMedia

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While waiting for Arcmap to export to AI, I will respond to what you have said...having not read the article...

GIS is a great analytical tool that in a state of perpetual high-visibility as the software/methods/data make huge leaps every year or so. It applies to most sciences, and academic departments seeing this, fold it into the curriculum.
Teaching GIS is also good for business, so it is taught from Ivy League to IT schools.




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