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How to symbolize overlapping polygons broken at roads?

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#1
johnnyh

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I hope that title isn't too confusing. :blink: Anyway, I am making a map for a ecosystem manager that wants a very busy map.

I have a symbolization problem to overcome. I need a way to clearly display all of the following:
  • units: most important
  • subunits (2 importance)
  • roads / creeks (still important and are usually used as breaks for units and subunits)
Attached is a map: dotted white = units, subunits = thinner black, roads = yellow. I tried a negative buffer for subunits, but really don't like the look. The outside black is a boundary.

And of course :unsure:, I need to have the best product possible done by tomorrow...
What would be an effective way to symbolize these?

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#2
benbakelaar

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I am looking at it, but I'm confused what you are asking about. Maybe it's just because I lack experience in this type of ecosystem map with units and sub-units... I don't even know what it is representing.

#3
johnnyh

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Sorry, it is confusing isn't it! :lol:

Units and subunits are just ways to classify landscapes into areas for management practices.

Usually, units, subunits are broken at roads. So the units and subunits share borders (along roads). All 3 occupy the same line, yet I need the map to clearly show all 3.

Attached are more maps that illustrate it more clearly
  • map 1: roads
  • map 2: units
  • map 3: subunits
  • map 4: All 3 - roads, units and subunits. Can't see what's what! :huh:

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#4
benbakelaar

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Could you make the road a hash, like train tracks? Not a standard way of representing roads, but considering they are #3 on your importance scale, may be a good way to avoid having a symbol that is three colors thick. Or maybe make the road a super-thin dashed pattern laying on top of the unit and subunit lines.

#5
ELeFevre

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I hope that title isn't too confusing. :blink: Anyway, I am making a map for a ecosystem manager that wants a very busy map.

I have a symbolization problem to overcome. I need a way to clearly display all of the following:

  • units: most important
  • subunits (2 importance)
  • roads / creeks (still important and are usually used as breaks for units and subunits)
Attached is a map: dotted white = units, subunits = thinner black, roads = yellow. I tried a negative buffer for subunits, but really don't like the look. The outside black is a boundary.

And of course :unsure: , I need to have the best product possible done by tomorrow...
What would be an effective way to symbolize these?


I would do-away with the "outside black boundary" . It's really confusing. Any area outside of the project-area could be grayed-out/white. I would use a solid line rather than the dashed line for the unit boundaries...maybe a muted blue or green semi-transparent so it doesn't jump off the page and punch you in the nose. You could represent the sub-boundaries with thinner lines of different colors, semi-transparent and muted. The roads/creeks should fall into place once the primary boundaries are more clear. My 2 cents.



#6
benbakelaar

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maybe a muted blue or green semi-transparent so it doesn't jump off the page and punch you in the nose.


Erin, I know you cartographers really get into your craft, but angry map colors jumping off the page and punching the viewer in the nose... well, that's just going a little too far :)

#7
Dennis McClendon

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Roads 1 pt 50% gray
Creeks .5 pt 100 cyan
Units 2 pt white line
Subunits 2 pt white line, dashed

Am I missing something?
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#8
MapMedia

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Johnny, Erin is essentially telling you to hump that map into submission!

As subunits and units can co-exist, you will need to use a colored, dashed line for subunits (maybe purple).
And yes, keep rivers/roads 0.5 to 0.75 pts thin. (If you plot poster size, 1pt roads become inky honkers IMHO).

Will the map be printed poster size for presentation or used in a report, web, etc.?

#9
ELeFevre

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maybe a muted blue or green semi-transparent so it doesn't jump off the page and punch you in the nose.


Erin, I know you cartographers really get into your craft, but angry map colors jumping off the page and punching the viewer in the nose... well, that's just going a little too far :)


A couple of months ago I had just finished a map when my co-worker walked up and said something like, "hey, not a bad looking, but that globe is like a punch in the nose". I thought it was pretty funny...an hour later:) Ultimately I ended up with a much improved map.



#10
johnnyh

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Thanks for advice all.

MapMedia, map will be poster size 34x44 inches.

Erin, that's what I wanted (muted transparent fills) to do but there are so many polygonal layers going into this thing I think I can only use lines for these.

... I've submitted what I have so far into the map gallery:
http://www.cartotalk...?showtopic=2086

Any advice there or here, is greatly appreciated :D




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