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Creating overlay maps using GIS

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#1
A. Fenix

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Hello everyone,

I'm new to this forum but wanted to dive right in. I'm attempting to make an "old school" overlay map from GIS data layers that I'm digitizing, and printing them out individually on mylar. Unfortunately, I've made almost all of my maps using high-tech GIS software and power plotters...and realize that I have lost my sense of how to make a more traditional cartographic work of art. So, I'm realizing that while my idea sounds totally plausible in my minds eye, I'm not sure that it will work in practice. Here is my question: Does anyone have any advice on creating overlay maps with GIS software...yet giving it a "historical" appearance? Are there any sites out there where people have labored to create more traditional symbologies for modern GIS?

I realize this post is a little general...but I hope that I'm being somewhat clear...

Any thoughts are greatly appreciated..

greenmapper
Analisa Fenix
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#2
Matthew Hampton

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There has recently been some effort at using high-tech GIS software to reproduce "historic maps." It is really "old school" (i.e. 17th-18th century old school). There was a presentation given at the last NACIS meeting conerning the historic techiniques, styles, etc. and a very nice packet of resources is available for creating Historic Map Effects with ESRI software.

It's a great starting point.

I would think if your main workhorse is ESRI software, then you could pretty efficiently make some marker symbols that fit the old school style of your choice. Maybe use some sepia tints and other "faded" colors. Based on Barnes's work, I think picking the right typeface(s) really helps the overall feeling.

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Martin Gamache

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http://www.fontcraft.com/mapmaker/

#4
A. Fenix

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http://www.fontcraft.com/mapmaker/



Thank you both for the leads. I knew that there had to be resources out there but was getting nowhere fast. Barnes work sounds interesting. I'll post my results to the Map Gallery when I'm done to get your insights and feedback.

Still, I hope that I can draw a map again one day. I only need the time and the materials... Perhaps there is a program out there that still teaches historical map making techniques? While I love my computer, I would really love to balance out my art by using ALL of the tools and techniques that have been handed down to us.

Anyway, thanks again!

greenmapper
Analisa Fenix
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#5
Charlie Frye

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I'm assuming you're trying to reproduce some thing along the lines of an Ian McHarg, "Design With Nature" type of overlay map. One other issue you'll face is that color models will be different. You'll first be dealing with the idea of trying to see whether composited 4 or 6 color printed output can actually be overlaid effectively. If not, the alternative is to do the work in GIS, though the color models on a computer are also different (additive versus subtractive), so the Mcharg formulas will not work as specified.

Good luck, sounds like an interesting problem given the modern context.
Charlie Frye
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