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Bump Mapping using Spatial Analyst (ESRI)

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#1
ernesto_carreras

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My Ernesto Carreras and I am a recent member in this forum. The re4ason for this message is because I have a couple of questions related to the Bump Mapping technique. I am trying to use this technique for a map that I am creating but for some reason, the expression provided in the ESRI website, it is not working. I am using the following expression:

(eucdistance(con( ($$rowmap mod int(normal() * 5 + 10) eq 0) and ($$colmap mod int (normal() * 5 + 10) eq 0),255),#,#,60,#)) * (-20 / 10) + 120

I tried copying and pasting the expression into the Raster Calculator, as well as typing it manually, but it did not worked. I am using as a reference J. Nighbert's paper but he uses DOQs to create the land cover (vegetation raster); therefore the example he uses does not work for me since I plan to use a land cover raster dataset created for the study area.

The first question is if that expression is correct. If not, how can I fix it? Another question is related on how to apply the parameters for the various vegetation types that I want to represent using this effect. Finally, is there any way this expression can be explained in words?

Any suggestions will be welcomed.
I can provide screenshots showing the settings I am using, if needed.
Ernesto Carreras
Geospatial Analyst II

#2
DaveB

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That looks like the exact formula I have used with success, but I've known other people to have difficulty with it. It seems to me the raster calculator is sensitive to formatting so make sure you don't have extra spaces (even before or after the expression; although I'm not sure that would cause problems). Also make sure it is one line (even though it automatically wraps in the raster calc window).
It may be that there are other reasons why it doesn't seem to work sometimes, but I'm not sure what those reasons might be.
I would probably try it out with a small subset of your data.

You can find a demo of this technique in the UC2005 Presentation .pdf at http://support.esri....l...eway&dmid=3
Although, Jeff Nighbert's paper is probably more definitive.
Dave Barnes
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#3
Charlie Frye

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Ernesto,

I'm not familiar with this methodology (I'm not sure if this the one Aileen authored, though we're pretty busy through tomorrow and cannot check in detail until afterwards), but when I'm confronted with a similarly complex problem, I go through it one step at a time manually--that usually turns up where the problem is. I would suggest trying to run the colormap, rowmap, then con, then eucdistance, and finally the math stuff to see where it's bogging down. If it works manually, then there's likely a syntax error.
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#4
ernesto_carreras

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Thanks a lot for the quick replies. I will take these suggestions and see what happens. Thanks again.
Ernesto Carreras
Geospatial Analyst II

#5
araki5

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Thanks a lot for the quick replies. I will take these suggestions and see what happens. Thanks again.

I was wondering if you might know a little about painted relief on a map. I have been experimenting for the better part of a year now on getting a "painted relief" effect on a quad. I use Spatial Analyst and 3D Analyst to try and get it, but to no avail. I have tried the links provide on this forum(relief shading and shaded relief) but I can't emulate those techniques.
Here is what I'm trying to emulate: http://gis.esri.com/...roc03/p0137.pdf

I even emailed the author, but no reply. In Figure 3 he has an excellent exampl of painted relief using hillshade and a base - and blending the 2. But no matter what transparency I set up, it looks really bad.

If you got any ideas please post.
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#6
frax

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Randy, to me that looks like an "ordinary" shaded relief, although beautifully crafted.
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#7
ernesto_carreras

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I agree with Hugo. It seems like it is just a shaded relief underneath the quad. Try giving the quad a 55% or 50% transparency. Start from there, see how it looks and then you can determine if you need to increase or decrease the transparency level. Good luck!
Ernesto Carreras
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#8
DaveB

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Of course it helps to start with good data. :)
Once you have a good hillshade there are things you can do to improve the appearance of the layer in the map, such as using a white to medium gray color ramp or even a ramp based on a particular color such as brown or green depending on your area (rather than the standard white to black ramp), setting transparency on the hillshade layer itself to tone it down, experimenting with contrast and brightness, using Bilinear inerpolation rather than the other smoothing options, and more advanced techniques such as multi-directional or Swiss-style shading.
You can find out more information on some of this in the ESRI BaseMap Data Model website.
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#9
araki5

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Of course it helps to start with good data. :)

Thanks Dave. It's always cool to have someone from ESRI lurking around. I think that since I'm not the most "artistic" of people, maybe my eye is not that good for looking at my finishe quads/shaded relief combo maps.

Thanks again and I'll still plug away.
Randy Long
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Mackay and Somps



Raster is Faster, but Vector is Corrector.

#10
DaveB

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Thanks Dave. It's always cool to have someone from ESRI lurking around. I think that since I'm not the most "artistic" of people, maybe my eye is not that good for looking at my finishe quads/shaded relief combo maps.

Thanks again and I'll still plug away.


:D

Well, you're in luck, you have a great group of cartographers here, with all sorts of experience and expertise, who can critique your maps for free. :D

Maybe, next time you are working on a map with hillshades and such you could post it and let the group offer helpful suggestions... :)
Dave Barnes
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#11
Matthew Hampton

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I think that the "transparency" function in ArcGIS visually dilutes the data/imagery somewhat. I have, on occasion, placed the hillshade on the topmost layer and made it 90% transparent with some success - leaving the other data on lower layers at 100%.

I have found much more pleasing visual output "blending" different layers in Photoshop (or Illustrator) by using the "multiply" function. This function looks at the color information in each channel and multiplies the base color by the blend color.

I think there is a command in the OLD ArcInfo that performs a similar function. It would be very nice to have different blending modes in Arc.

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#12
Martin Gamache

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Looking through Tom Patterson's website will also give you several ideas such as using a slope image to add some details to the shading.

well worth spending some time with...

and of course there is Imhof.

m

#13
frax

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one can of course do the blend the Spatial Analyst/GRID way, and calculate new RGB values based on the respective channels in two raster layers (treating each rgb image as a three-channel grid stack)
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