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Cartographer finds fun in lost art of hand-drawn maps


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#1
David T

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Cartographer finds fun in lost art of hand-drawn maps

Interesting little read. I'd love to find out more about what this guy has done, and how he's done it.

My training has been completely in the digital world. Knowing my tendencies, I don't know if I'd have the time or patience to do things by hand. I've often thought about, though. I thought it'd be a fun hobby to get a drawing desk, put that in my living room, and try my hand at hand drawing some maps.
David Toney, GISP
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#2
DaveB

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Me, too. :D
It would be cool to see examples of his work, too.
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#3
Mike H

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I love hand drwan maps. I think some aspects of what we call digital maps are really hand drawn maps, we just use a mouse instead of a pen or scribe to draw with.


Jane Crosen does hand drawn maps of Maine, she has a great eye and has proven to be a valuable design critic for my work. She just went on-line:

http://www.mainemapmaker.com/

and Molly Holmberg, who is finishing her masters at CU Boulder, and is the NACIS student representative, does hand drawn maps:

www.mollymaps.com


The single most influencial map, and hence mapmaker, for me was Erwin Raisz. It was his detailed maps that really got me interested in drawing maps, just about the time Freehand 3 on a mac provided an alternative to pen and ink.

http://world.std.com/~jraisz/
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#4
Lui

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Well my first maps were handrawn. I was 8 years old and my first map is still somwhere around.
Lately I've found that handrawing improves my mapping skills especially in hillshading and other relief presentations. So when the evening comes and kids are in bed and my wife has ... I take my pencils, rubber (it should be a small one) and regular (A4) sheet of paper. I'm dreaming about small medieval towns near rivers, gorges, cliffs,...
The first and the most difficult step in creating such map is relief creation. Usually I'm presenting relief directly with hillshading. It is very difficult to hillshade fictitious terrain without contours.
When relief creation is over (after several evenings) is the time to build medieval town. I've figure out that towns are looking far better if there is some kind of story and development behind. Usually the town begin to grow around naturally propitious place like ferryboat, small easy defenseable hill, island,... There quicklly emerges inns, cottages, shops, fortress later churches, castle and so on. Yes I'm from Europe and have played Civilization a lot:-). In this phase I'm completlly absorbed in this map fantasy and it is far better than anykind of TV or computer fun. The medieval town hasn't been allowed to grown till present time but it shouldn't be a problem. But small and different is beautifull.

Yes I know, I should scan one of those maps and show it here.

Sail safe in real world and swift in the fantasy one.

Lui

#5
DaveB

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Lui,
That sounds interesting and fun. Please do show us an example. :D

I, too, made hand-drawn maps when I was a kid, but none survive (they'd almost be antique maps now! :P ).

p.s. I have spent many late hours playing the various releases of Sid Meier's Civilization games (as well as some of his other games: Colonization, Sword of the Samurai, etc.)
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#6
natcase

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Jane Crosen does hand drawn maps of Maine, she has a great eye and has proven to be a valuable design critic for my work. She just went on-line:

http://www.mainemapmaker.com/


Thanks for the link to Jane's page. I've loved her maps for years. Glad to see she's keeping on; I used to have one of her parody map t-shirts, but it wore out years ago... I should probably get a new one.

I also like Mike Reagan's map illustrations. I was especially taken by his "bloody" map of Sudan (not shown in this sample of his New Yorker work) in the New Yorker years ago... really effective expressive map-art.

Nat Case
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#7
DaveB

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I also like Mike Reagan's map illustrations. I was especially taken by his "bloody" map of Sudan (not shown in this sample of his New Yorker work) in the New Yorker years ago... really effective expressive map-art.


Those links don't work for me :(
Dave Barnes
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#8
Jean-Louis

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Most of the stuff I do still involves a lot of hand drawn renditions.
There was a time when the objective of illustrations done by hand was to make it look so sharp and perfect as to look like what computers do now. And then these days the objective of computer illustrations is to recapture imperfections and textures that make it look hand-drawn.
I posted in map Gallery an example of one of the last all hand-drawn maps I made which inluded hand drawn lettering which was a real pain to do.
Jean-Louis Rheault
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