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A Cartographic Riddle - The Euro Banknote Map

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#1
billie709sn

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The current January 2007 issue of hidden europe magazine (www.hiddeneurope.co.uk) has an interesting article that unravels a cartographic riddle that has bemused Europe since the euro banknotes were introduced. Why is it that the Faroe Islands are shown on the map of Europe on the banknotes (even though they are not EU members), while Malta is not shown? Around the British Isles, the Isle of Man is shown (not an EU member), but the Isle of Wight is not - even though it is politically part of England so a fully paid-up part of the EU. This conundrum is explored in the article that explores the cartographic significance of what might to the non-expert appear to be no more than a few random dots on the map. The full text of the article is presently online on the magazine's website - though the selection of online articles just change from time to time. For now, though, go to the table of contents for the January 2007 issue of hidden europe, and look for the article entitled 'more than just dots'. The full text is there as a pdf file that can be downloaded. Elsewhere in the same issue there a reference to the map of Azerbaijan that appears on the new Azeri banknotes.

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natcase

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The current January 2007 issue of hidden europe magazine (www.hiddeneurope.co.uk) has an interesting article that unravels a cartographic riddle that has bemused Europe since the euro banknotes were introduced. Why is it that the Faroe Islands are shown on the map of Europe on the banknotes (even though they are not EU members), while Malta is not shown? Around the British Isles, the Isle of Man is shown (not an EU member), but the Isle of Wight is not - even though it is politically part of England so a fully paid-up part of the EU.


Very interesting. Just ran into a similar issue from 1949, the postage stamp map of Newfoundland, which omits Labrador but includes St Pierre et Miquelon...

Nat Case
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