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Pictorial map of Montreal

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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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This is the map Jean-Louis placed in his introduction topic.



No idea why it wouldn't attach for you in the first place, but I think there is a limit on filesize.

Anyway, great map!
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#2
ELeFevre

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Jean-Louis,

Nice map! Would you mind telling us a little about how you create pictorial maps? I wouldn't even now where to begin. Is it drawn and colored by hand? Do you use a GIS?



#3
Jean-Louis

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Hi Erin,

Well I like to say that it is 10% inspiration and 90 % perspiration.
There is a lot of different approaches to creating pictorial maps. The example of this one of montreal was entirely done by hand with rapidograph and watercolor. It required over 1000 hours of work. This type of map is harder to do than a straight oblique-view axonometric type of pictorial map because it is not to scale (or rather because it interlocks different scales).

In an axonometric type of map, you take your street plan and extend a third dimension. This Geopictorial map of Montreal (I coined the word) is somewhat done in reverse. The buildings are sketched almost as if they were seen from street level and then assembled in a way to get the best possible view of all the elements. The street grid is then made to fit into that. The objective is to see in one image what you can't see in a photo or a straight 3-d perspective. I f you look at the attached cutout of this map you can see for instance, some specific small store buildings behind a highrise without being misled about the actual location.

Of course this means that you end up constantly sketching roughs where all your elements become a rubic cube of variables with the predictablle risk to sanity that entails.



Basically to answer your question, pictorial maps are done by imagining what you think something will look like from a certain point of view and then you prceed to sketch it out untill it looks right.
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal


#4
Hans van der Maarel

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Hmmm... It appeared the Map Gallery was set to not accept any uploads from normal users. We're working on fixing this.



For some reason I can't get Jean-Louis's latest attachment up here. Could you try adding it again?
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#5
Jean-Louis

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Ok Hans, it seems to be working the attachement option now appears on the reply page. So here is the image that goes with my previous post
Attached File  focus_CV.jpg   377KB   248 downloads
Jean-Louis Rheault
Montreal





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