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Volunteer Monitoring Map

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#1
peanut

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The Colorado River Watch Network is a volunteer water quality monitoring program. Monitors collect data at various sites within the Colorado River Basin in Texas. We have used Google Maps to allow for people to easily view this data. The map can be seen at http://crwn.lcra.org

The map shows the location of sites that are currently monitored and those that are not currently monitored in the Colorado River Basin. The map also makes extensive use of the ability within the Google Maps API to add custom tile layers. If you zoom in 3 levels beyond the initial view you will start to see a watershed map rendered as a tile layer. This watershed map is available for the next 3 zoom levels. If you zoom in beyond the watershed map in the City of Austin area you will see detailed streams also rendered as tile layers.

Let me know what you guys think of this use of the Google Maps API.

Rich

#2
CHART

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Keeps getting better!

Impressive work with Google. I like your watershed rendering. However it might confuse the user when he suddenly goes from your rendition to the google one.

Again nice use of Google.
Chart

#3
benbakelaar

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Excellent indeed, I especially like the transparent infowindow that appears on a mouseover event.

As for the watersheds, maybe you've just updated this, but the polygons show up in all zoom levels for me, and as you mention get more detailed as you zoom in. I don't think this will confuse the user since the polygon boundaries are always present.

You may want to look into the latest ways to add custom images - you don't necessarily have to do tile layers anymore. Check out Mike Williams' tutorial for stuff regarding KML overlays. I think you basically overlay an image in Google Earth, export the KML, do some minor modifications, and then you can pass the KML (which links to the original overlaid image) directly to the API.

#4
peanut

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The watershed polygons you see when the map first comes up and for the first few zoom levels were added using Mike Williams method. There are a few limitations to this method. First the Google Maps API doesn't seem to render tiles for KML files that are over about 1 meg using this method. Also you have a lot more control over the final product when you make your own custom tile layer. The downside to making your own custom tile layer as opposed to having Google render it from your KML is that it is alot more work.

This Google Maps API stuff is so much fun!!!

Rich

#5
benbakelaar

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Just thought people might be interested in this new software created by UCL CASA.

http://www.casa.ucl....emapcreator.asp

Takes a SHP file, exports a tileset. Not too configurable at this point - but for those non-techies or frustrated techies, it's better than nothing!

At some point, some user (or ESRI itself!) should write a tool to directly export a tileset (with projection matching) from ArcGIS's display screen. It's not like Google Maps is the only tool that use tilesets - there are at least three open-source map/WMS servers that use tilesets too, including the original "MapServer" from UMN.




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