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New evidence of recent asteroid impacts?

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#1
benbakelaar

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http://www.nytimes.c...amp;oref=slogin

Does anyone else think this is like one of the coolest (yea, ok, scariest too) things ever? Anyone know more about this topic? I'm all about humanity getting to space, regardless of whether its due to global warming/climate change, threat of asteroid impact, overpopulation, whatever... let's just get there and start exploring!

#2
GISRox

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http://www.nytimes.c...amp;oref=slogin

Does anyone else think this is like one of the coolest (yea, ok, scariest too) things ever? Anyone know more about this topic? I'm all about humanity getting to space, regardless of whether its due to global warming/climate change, threat of asteroid impact, overpopulation, whatever... let's just get there and start exploring!


Get into space and live where? It's not like Mars, Venus or the other planets can offer what earth has in terms of environment.

Nonetheless, the topic is indeed very interesting and scary! We have so many potential natural disasters than can take man out. Volcanism, earthquakes, and the one that isn't talked about much, polarity changes. IE north/south pole reversal. Some geophysicists speculate that man could be wiped out during a big polarity change....



#3
benbakelaar

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Get into space and live where? It's not like Mars, Venus or the other planets can offer what earth has in terms of environment.


I should have been more specific, I'm not talking about a mass exodus, I agree it would be impossible to "re-locate" even 1% of our current population - what's that, 6 million people? Forget that, even 0.1%, 600 thou. :) I'm talking about humanity as a species having the ability to get off the planet.

Whether that means living in a giant spaceship, on another planet, in Dyson spheres (? is that what they were called)... I'm just all about us spending the money to develop the technology and capabilities, and any new evidence that pushes funding towards that is great in my mind.

#4
GISRox

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I've thought about this subject quite a bit over the years. When I was in junior high, I wanted to live in space sooooo bad. Now that I've hit 40 and fly fish as much as possible in my spare time, I've come to realize that I'd never want to live on a space ship or in some sort of "sphere". I just don't think that is a great way to live a life.

I'd still like to see us do much, much, more with space exploration. We really need to do more with regard to space exploration. I think we will need to revamp NASA and perhaps the way we go about exploring space on a global scale.



#5
benbakelaar

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Well exactly right, on a "global scale". The private space industry is really coming together, relative to where it was 10 years ago. Richard Branson is working on the New Mexico spaceport. Brazil and China are set to shake up the arena of space politics... (yikes, more space race wars!).

Anyway, I have a feeling I will get to where you are now Paul... eventually.

#6
Matthew Hampton

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Things seems to be spiraling off-topic. It seems to me we don't really have to live on another planet - just re-locate a few hundred miles inland :P .

But seriously, I think this planet has (de)evolved into (barely) withholding a domninant species that has incidently caused enough global disturbance to relegate itself in the interplanetary realm as cast-offs.

Sure, us crazy humans' have done some pretty cool things that could have some utility to other (higher) beings, but would you really want us to spread and pollute the rest of space? I think "experiment planet earth" has a ways to go before we can justify interplanetary proliferation.

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#7
benbakelaar

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Sure, us crazy humans' have done some pretty cool things that could have some utility to other (higher) beings, but would you really want us to spread and pollute the rest of space? I think "experiment planet earth" has a was to go before we can justify interplanetary proliferation.


Well I agree we've created change on a global scale, but I don't see how the change being caused by us is any different than a change caused by an asteroid impact, or a super volcano, or a nearby star going supernova, or our sun burning out. Is it humanity's responsbility to "maintain the status quo"? I'm a sucker for Star Trek's line, somewhat paraphrased here "to go and seek out new life".

#8
Derek Tonn

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Does anyone else think this is like one of the coolest (yea, ok, scariest too) things ever? Anyone know more about this topic?


I guess what scares me more is just how few people out there really realize how fragile life is on earth, and how most of our silly differences and debate add up to one big pile of nothing on a "macro" level.

1. Viruses and Plagues (like the bird flu)
2. Asteroid Impacts
3. Earthquakes in areas with substandard construction
4. Tsunamis
5. Volcanoes (especially Yellowstone)

One area I absolutely would NOT want to live right now is Seattle-Tacoma. Between the off-shore fault line that is overdue for some major seismic activity and Mt. Rainer, that absolutely beautiful part of the United States is overdue for some 11-12 figure ($) devastation. I hope it doesn't happen in my lifetime, but that's the thing, it WILL happen sometime. :unsure:

....and I'm sure when it does, politicians and all the talking heads in the media will say "we never saw it coming".....just like all the folks said after Katrina knocked New Orleans around like a rag-doll. Ignorance is bliss, I guess! Personally though, I'd rather know what I am up against, and do what little I can to try and protect my family *IF* it is the type of disaster that can be survived. If Yellowstone goes or we get hit with a large asteroid though, might be better to stand under things and go right away......
Derek Tonn
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mapformation, LLC

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http://www.mapformation.com

#9
Hans van der Maarel

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4. Tsunamis


Or just rising sea levels in general :D But yeah, our society is pretty vulnerable for catastrophic events like that and given the fact that some of the most 'productive' areas in the world nowadays (Silicon Valley, Japan, Seattle/Vancouver) are in serious danger from several of those events, I guess we should be somewhat worried.
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