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Historic Map Effects with ArcGIS

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#1
paul

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From the James Fee blog:

http://www.spatially...ts-with-arcgis/

I'm a GIS guy, but a novice cartographer, so this looks like a pretty good "ESRI-centric" learning resource for ArcMap users.

#2
Matthew Hampton

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I have been waiting to get the basemap resources from the NACIS site, but things don't seem to be updating that quickly over there.

David Barnes (et.al.) did a nice presentation at NACIS about this and has really done a great job at bending ArcGIS to make those nice maps.

I can't wait to play.

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#3
DonnaG

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It's there at:
http://support.esri....l...eway&dmid=3
in the Downloads - Design Templates section.

Yeah, I had trouble finding it and ended up emailing Aileen B. for a link.

I was also under the impression that all the Practical Cartography Day presentations were going to be posted on the NACIS site. I'm not finding that either. Anybody else know anything about this?


Donna G.

#4
DaveB

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David Barnes (et.al.) did a nice presentation at NACIS about this and has really done a great job at bending ArcGIS to make those nice maps.


Thanks for the interest :)

Aileen Buckley gave the presentation (speaking part B) ) and Jaynya Richards created the fonts and many of the symbols in the downloads. :D
Dave Barnes
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#5
David T

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It's a nice package, and I spent some time today playing with it. I noticed Arc 8.3 doesn't play with the material as nicely as 9.1. But, that's the fault of my desktop at work being a 8.3 machine (no choice in that matter) and an off-network laptop, that I have admin rights on, being a 9.1 machine.

I'm a little curious about the fonts. Hopefully someone can point me in the right direction here. The presentation mentions that the only font that had to be purchased was the P22 Mayflower font. It mentions 5 other fonts. I am having a heck of a time locating Castellar and Imprint MT Shadow, though. The impression I'm getting from the presentation is that I should have those fonts.

I don't mind purchasing them if I have to, but, if the presenters are sure that they didn't need to be purchased...can you direct me in some direction of obtaining those fonts?

I've only spent a few minutes with the package. I'm looking forward to spending some quality time with it, to see what I can do with my Base. I'd love to see this package fleshed out a little bit more - I noticed some gaps here and there (such as a quick overview on getting the parchment background going on the Caribbean map - I know how to do it, but someone else might not).

The Carto presentations are always full capacity rooms at the UC. I'd love to see this one at the UC. I bet it would be another 'sell-out'.

Good job guys. More feedback as I play around in the package some more. Thanks for any help on the fonts.
David Toney, GISP
GIS Manager
United States Marine Corps
West Coast Installations

#6
Maisie

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It's there at:
http://support.esri....l...eway&dmid=3
in the Downloads - Design Templates section.



Which of those options is it?

#7
David T

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It's there at:
http://support.esri....l...eway&dmid=3
in the Downloads - Design Templates section.



Which of those options is it?


Specifically, it's the 'NACIS 2006' link, which will download a zip file called 'Historical_Map_Effects.zip'.
David Toney, GISP
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United States Marine Corps
West Coast Installations

#8
DaveB

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I'm a little curious about the fonts. Hopefully someone can point me in the right direction here. The presentation mentions that the only font that had to be purchased was the P22 Mayflower font. It mentions 5 other fonts. I am having a heck of a time locating Castellar and Imprint MT Shadow, though. The impression I'm getting from the presentation is that I should have those fonts.

I don't mind purchasing them if I have to, but, if the presenters are sure that they didn't need to be purchased...can you direct me in some direction of obtaining those fonts?

I've only spent a few minutes with the package. I'm looking forward to spending some quality time with it, to see what I can do with my Base. I'd love to see this package fleshed out a little bit more - I noticed some gaps here and there (such as a quick overview on getting the parchment background going on the Caribbean map - I know how to do it, but someone else might not).

The Carto presentations are always full capacity rooms at the UC. I'd love to see this one at the UC. I bet it would be another 'sell-out'.

Good job guys. More feedback as I play around in the package some more. Thanks for any help on the fonts.


As far as I can find Castellar and Imprint MT aren't quite free, but do come with many MS products, such as MS Office 2003. I'll see about getting that cleared up in the information.

As far as I know there is nothing about the pictures or fonts or styles that is specific to 9.x vs. 8.x, but some of the gui is likely different.

I'll see if we can add more info about using the parchment fill, too.

As for the UC, it's true (and gratifying) that the cartographic sessions are well-attended. In spite of the size of the UC (in the number of sessions, for example) it's still limited, so the planners try to reach a good balance of sessions and take into account things like session attendance. Which is one reason the advanced cartography session was given 3 times instead of the usual 2 times. I know they are considering a session on symbols and symbol creation. I'll try to pass along your interest.

Thanks for the input! :D
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#9
David T

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Thanks Dave, I appreciate it.



As far as I can find Castellar and Imprint MT aren't quite free, but do come with many MS products, such as MS Office 2003. I'll see about getting that cleared up in the information.


I will continue to do some checking. I'm on a government computer here at work, and the Marine Corps has MS Office 2003 deployed system wide. But I can't find those fonts installed here. I also have my own copy of it home, but don't see it installed. I may try pulling out the install discs to see if the fonts are on there, and were perhaps an additional install.

I'll see if we can add more info about using the parchment fill, too.


I've been doing some thinking about that comment. I was reviewing the Cornwall map today, and didn't quite get the process for adding the graded color vignette and coastal edging. I'm going to guess that the color effect that is on the land mass is a result of a graded color vignette, but it took me a couple of read throughs to figure that out. (I haven't given it a try yet, though).

At the 2004 UC (I believe that was the one), the Cartographic session did a great job of going step by step on the process for the creation of shaded relief, hillshades and the 'swiss effect'. It was a fantastic session. I was able to do a lot of nice work straight from my notes at the UC. I know it's hard to do something like that in that forum, and a bit easier to review the steps, and then put those into the notes that are released after the conference, or put up into the Basemap page.

I don't want to appear to be looking a gift-horse in the mouth. This packet is putting me in the right direction, creatively, for doing these types of maps in ArcMap. I look forward to spending a lot of time reviewing the techniques in detail. I enjoy spending time figuring things out.

Having said that, though, and knowing that this was the first release of this information, I hope you'll be able to put together a 'more thorough' packet in the future. I don't know if that's the right way to put that, but, I would love to see more 'step-by-step' directions in there.

Let me say thanks again for releasing this. I really appreciate it. The guide is great, and I'm going to continue looking through it. As I come up with good notes, I will definitely pass those along.
David Toney, GISP
GIS Manager
United States Marine Corps
West Coast Installations

#10
Dennis McClendon

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To paraphrase Johnson: "Emulating historic maps with GIS is like a dog's walking on his hinder legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all."
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#11
natcase

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I'm a little curious about the fonts. Hopefully someone can point me in the right direction here. The presentation mentions that the only font that had to be purchased was the P22 Mayflower font. It mentions 5 other fonts. I am having a heck of a time locating Castellar and Imprint MT Shadow, though. The impression I'm getting from the presentation is that I should have those fonts.


I think the typography, while a good start, needs more options. There are many fonts that will emulate specific looks and feels for diffferent historic eras and techniques. Consider, for example, Sirenne as a font that imitates hand-lettered copper and stone-litho text ? Dave, this is the font I mentioned to you at NACIS. Other fonts from MVB (Chanson d'Amour and Gryphius) are also intriguing. P22 is another good source for historic-style fonts.

I hope others will suggest more sources...

Larry Bowring did a session on similar techniques in Illustrator a few years ago at NACIS, including suggesting fonts appropriate to specific eras; does anyone have his notes to hand? See a thumbnail of his Cape May map here

Nat Case
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maphead.blogspot.com



#12
Mike H

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I hope others will suggest more sources...


...well, do the linework and fills in Arc, print it out, then hand letter the text using india ink and calligraphy pens, scan the resulting map, make it a geo-referenced tiff, and *presto* You have a historical GIS map!


...sorry, couldn't resist... it's late and I need to choose sleep or more caffiene...

m.
Michael Hermann
mike [at] purplelizard.com


www.purplelizard.com

#13
David T

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As far as I can find Castellar and Imprint MT aren't quite free, but do come with many MS products, such as MS Office 2003. I'll see about getting that cleared up in the information.

I did some follow-up research this evening, and here's what I discovered:

Castellar and Imprint MT Shadow are included with MS Office 2003, as long as you install MS Office Publisher. MS Office, on it's install, doesn't install *all* fonts that it comes with. From Microsoft's support page:

Note that while the fonts are installed by the Office installation, the installation options that you select determine the specific fonts that are installed. All the available fonts are not installed when you do a "typical" installation of Office.

I didn't have Publisher installed, which explains why I was missing those fonts. With Publisher installed, those fonts finally showed up.

Nothing I can do with my Marine Corps issued computer - although the Marine Corps licenses Office, I don't believe Publisher is part of that license. Because of that, I won't have access to those fonts on that primary machine at work.
David Toney, GISP
GIS Manager
United States Marine Corps
West Coast Installations

#14
David T

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I hope others will suggest more sources...

I hope so, as well. Since this was a discussion about this particular package that ESRI put together, that's why I was inquiring specifically about these fonts. Additional font suggestions would help make the package more robust. Getting additional information about the fonts that were suggested in this package, also makes this educational offering more robust.

To paraphrase Johnson: "Emulating historic maps with GIS is like a dog's walking on his hinder legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all."

Dennis - I hope I'm misinterpreting what you're suggesting with your paraphrase.

I would agree that ArcGIS is not the most robust graphics package out there. Considering that the first priority in my day job is to be a GIS Technician, ArcGIS is my primary tool. I have to use ArcGIS to accomplish my job.

In a perfect world, I would take my data out of ArcGIS, bring it into Freehand or Illustrator, and finish up the magic there. Unfortunately, this isn't a perfect world - I work for the Federal Government. :P

I don't have a license for Illustrator, Freehand, or anything like that in my job. I have ArcGIS and I have a plotter. That's it. I have to use the tools that are available to me. I don't have any clients (save the audience I produce for), and I don't have to worry about sending anything off to a printer. No one will be buying my maps.

My own background is in cartography first, and GIS second. But, the position I am requires that I am a GIS Technician first. As the man who hired me said, 'the fact that you're a cartographer is just icing on the cake'. Sadly, GOOD maps are hard to come by in my office (and I use the word 'map' here loosely).

I spend most of my time doing data management. I get very little time to actually make maps. Every few months, I block off a week or two, and concentrate my time on making good cartographic products. But, it's hard to find the time to do it.

I can appreciate that as a private cartographer, you need to use the best tools for the job. And the tools that will make you most productive. I completely agree with that. I can also appreciate that, on occasion, because I work in the public sector, I have the time to tinker with the tools that I have. Time that you don't have. If I decide that it's in the best interest of my office for me to spend a week making a historic-type map in ArcGIS, I have that luxury. (Heck, if I want to spend two weeks building a database to keep track of projects, I can do that, too).

The point I'm trying to make, is that it's easy to dismiss ArcGIS as a graphics tool. But, we shouldn't do that. I find having that limitation to be pretty freeing, actually. I push myself to make the best map I can, using this tool. I *refuse* to let my lack of a professional graphics software package be my excuse for not producing quality cartographic products. Oh, I get frustrated. Many a time have I uttered 'if I could do this in Freehand, I could have done this in 5 minutes!'. It takes time, and creativity, to figure out a way to get things done in ArcGIS sometimes. But, I relish those moments when I've figured out something cool, something that gets the job done, and something that looks good.

So, while producing historic looking maps in ArcGIS might not be done well, in your opinion - I guess I'm going to have to do my best to see if I can shatter that notion. All I can do is try! :)
David Toney, GISP
GIS Manager
United States Marine Corps
West Coast Installations

#15
MapMedia

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Thanks David for starting this thread - its been a real 'afterburner' for me to spend some attention to this - having heard about the ESRI presentation. Its in all of our interest to push ESRI products to the limit re: cartography.

I think Dennis was essentially saying he was surprised and excited about these new features, while of course recognizing that drawing programs likely will do a better job in the end.

But I like your response - since before going freelance I had a similar job: expediency was a high priority, but I had my own person mission to somehow make as many of the quick & dirty maps to look as awesome as possible. More power to you!




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