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Historic Map Effects with ArcGIS

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#16
Mike H

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I think its great to see any software pushed to new directions. The work Dave B. and Ailleen, et al, have done to integrate these historical "art" tools into Arc is simply fun, and may be the very first time an ESRI product has had a non-essential aspect embedded in it. It's interesting to hear feedback from the diverse users on this board, where some folks never have an opportunity to use Arc, while others never have the opportunity to use a graphics program in their workplace.

All of our software tools have become so robust very few of us have the time or interest to pursue all thier strengths, so we rely on a few individuals to dive in and see what they can make happen.

Now - back to the font question:

Here's my favorite font guy, the original Traveling Font Salesman from those wild days of the early digital revolution, circa 1992, the chankster:

http://www.chank.com/

Check out Bell Martellus on sale for a whopping 9.95... or look at the top-shelf flavors such as Woodrow, or maybe Zsa Zsa Galore?

enjoy!
Michael Hermann
mike [at] purplelizard.com


www.purplelizard.com

#17
DaveB

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I think the typography, while a good start, needs more options. There are many fonts that will emulate specific looks and feels for diffferent historic eras and techniques. Consider, for example, Sirenne as a font that imitates hand-lettered copper and stone-litho text ? Dave, this is the font I mentioned to you at NACIS. Other fonts from MVB (Chanson d'Amour and Gryphius) are also intriguing. P22 is another good source for historic-style fonts.


Absolutely! I think fonts are one of the keys to capturing a feel/flavor and there are many fonts one could use for historic maps. Sirenne looks good. Some others I like are Telegdi, Operina, Ted Staunton's Sherwood fonts. Blambot has some cool fonts, mostly designed for comic book lettering, but some of the styles could be useful for mapping. He has both free and pay fonts. Some alternatives to Imprint and other 18th/19th century fonts would be good, too.

Dennis' quote isn't far off the mark, I guess. In fact it does kind of hit part of the point and one which others have talked about. That is the idea of pushing software and of using our cartographic license to do things many people don't know can be done. I know the maps wouldn't fool an antique map expert :unsure: , but as long as this exercise gives people ideas and helps anyone in any way I'll be happy. :D (besides, as Mike H said, it's fun :) )

(in regards to stretching ArcMap/GIS) to be continued... :)
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek

#18
Dennis McClendon

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I don't have a license for Illustrator, Freehand, or anything like that in my job. I have ArcGIS and I have a plotter. That's it. I have to use the tools that are available to me.


In the early 1980s, I worked for Arthur Andersen. The managers had just been given PCs, and told to make use of them. So one of my bosses, a public relations manager, would type her weekly status reports in VisiCalc, an early fixed-cell-length spreadsheet, eight characters at a time. Any change to any word required her (or me) to retype every word in that line, in eight-character groups. But she was using the tools available to her.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#19
MapMedia

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would type her weekly status reports in VisiCalc


I bet she backed it all up on those 8" floppies! lol Then Apple came along...

#20
DaveB

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I don't have a license for Illustrator, Freehand, or anything like that in my job. I have ArcGIS and I have a plotter. That's it. I have to use the tools that are available to me.


In the early 1980s, I worked for Arthur Andersen. The managers had just been given PCs, and told to make use of them. So one of my bosses, a public relations manager, would type her weekly status reports in VisiCalc, an early fixed-cell-length spreadsheet, eight characters at a time. Any change to any word required her (or me) to retype every word in that line, in eight-character groups. But she was using the tools available to her.


If you're comparing using an early fixed-cell-length spreadsheet for word processing to using a GIS for making maps I have to disagree with you. GIS applications have their strengths and graphics programs have theirs, but people make good maps (and bad) with both types of applications with a little effort or a lot or no effort at all.
Dave Barnes
Esri
Product Engineer
Map Geek




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