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subway map - schematic vs physical

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#1
frax

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For the Stockholm subway, we have always had schematic subway maps (not like the NY one), like this one - this is the latest one, I liked the previous one better. I am just curious what it would look like like to stretch it out to the actual physical proportions.

So if I have a scanned map and the schematic map, if I can identify the same points (the stations) in both, is there some easy software to use to morph them? There might actually be maps with the actual lines underground though (then one would just need to bring them out, and trace them).

What would be could would be to use a morph/animation.
Hugo Ahlenius
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#2
CHART

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:blink: Well I found a few typo errors so here is the corrected version.

From what I understand you are trying to rubber-sheet a drawing (the subway lines) to an existing scanned map...
1. The scanned map obviously needs to be geo-referenced accurately.
2. You then need a raster rubber sheeting tool that can provided at least a 5th order polynomial method of adjusting raster to a geo-referenced raster map (ground control). To get a 5th order polynomial adjustment you need at least 10 (I think 10 is the number) matching control points.
3. There is another rubber-sheeting method that forces the matching points exactly to your reference points (the map) as specified without residuals (true match method - it does not calculate any residuals and thus the raster is stretched exactly to your match points).

When rubber-sheeting the more matching (control) points the better.

In your case I would go with a true rubber-sheeting (2) approach.


Hopping I understood your post correctly...

In my case I work with PCI software and few old MapInfo addons.
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#3
frax

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Hi,

Thanks for the response... Since it is more a "stretch out graphic" thing, the geo-referencing shouldn't matter at all (I am not going to do any overlays or anything, and bring in other data), the graphic coordinate system should work fine.

I don't think any GIS rubber-sheeting would work very well though, at least my experience with trying to rubbersheet graphics in ArcGIS. What might be the best solution would be to just identify the stations on the scanned map, and then draw lines in-between them. I have played with a software called "WinMorph" before for morphing, it might work here as well.

Anyways, I don't really have time for this right now...
Hugo Ahlenius
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#4
Hans van der Maarel

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I tried doing something like this years ago. Went all-digital that time, but only used GIS data as reference. I tried to construct it from there (Illustrator). If I'd do it again, I'd probabely sketch one up on graph paper before trying it digitally.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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