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#1
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This was taken off the MapRoom site...

Credit card size maps of Subways (Tubes). Very interesting yet simple concept. ... for non techkies...

http://www.firebox.c...p;src_id=subway
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#2
Matthew Hampton

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Another take on this is the Z card. It is the size of a credit card but quickly unfolds to a larger size (the credit cards max at 9.25"x23.25" - 12x3 panels, 2-sided).

I think they are an incredible marketing package for maps. They also come in a jumbo card size (5"x3.5") that prints on 13.75"x37.5". In addition to the Z-fold, they also do a k-fold, c-fold, and a n/m-fold. I haven't produced any yet - but am hoping to.

Oregon Metro - Portland, OR
www.oregonmetro.gov


#3
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Another take on this is the Z card. It is the size of a credit card but quickly unfolds to a larger size (the credit cards max at 9.25"x23.25" - 12x3 panels, 2-sided).

I think they are an incredible marketing package for maps. They also come in a jumbo card size (5"x3.5") that prints on 13.75"x37.5". In addition to the Z-fold, they also do a k-fold, c-fold, and a n/m-fold. I haven't produced any yet - but am hoping to.


Matthew,

After your post I sent for some info on the z card product. They sent me a promotional package. Seems interesting. Also note they have a super jumbo size (6 x 4). This makes it an ideal size for folded map products. Problem I see is in the cost. Like all print jobs you need the big numbers (10,000 copies) to start making it worth while.
Best Regards and thanks for the lead.
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#4
MapMedia

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Seems like this would be an ideal graphic for a metro card - a debit card where you put money on it like a cell phone.

#5
Derek Tonn

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I've been very interested in the Z-card concept for a while now as well. I also am working with a relatively-new product called "SeeBuddee", which take maps of up to roughly 13"x19" in size and reduces them down on to 70mm IMAX film, then packages them into a self-collapsing, manual-focusing plastic unit with a mounted 3X-5X lens to a size of 2"x3"x0.5". Very interesting.....the developer of the product sold 35,000 units in 11 days at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic Games (at $5/unit). I've got a three-year "exclusive" related to all mapping applications of the SeeBuddee product, and we'll be launching a new web site and marketing campaign for it in the winter/spring. It seems like a product that is primarily geared for outdoor-types (ski resort, fishing, snowmobilers, boating/yachting, military, etc.), since it is very durable AND waterproof! However, we're trying to see if we cannot try and also get into other markets...such as higher ed, city/area map sales and "destination" properties.

If anyone is interested in talking about SeeBuddee in more detail, let me know via PM/email. Sorry for the "thread hijack!" However, I thought this was a good place to mention that alternative as well, as it is all-about taking big "paper" maps and finding new and convenient ways for packaging them that people will buy and use. B)
Derek Tonn
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#6
Martin Gamache

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The Boston T (MBTA) used to give away a credit card size ( 1 fold) map of the subway system that was fairly useful. But given the modest size of the network it wasn't too difficult.

mg

#7
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I've been very interested in the Z-card concept for a while now as well. I also am working with a relatively-new product called "SeeBuddee", which take maps of up to roughly 13"x19" in size and reduces them down on to 70mm IMAX film, then packages them into a self-collapsing, manual-focusing plastic unit with a mounted 3X-5X lens to a size of 2"x3"x0.5". Very interesting.....the developer of the product sold 35,000 units in 11 days at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic Games (at $5/unit). I've got a three-year "exclusive" related to all mapping applications of the SeeBuddee product, and we'll be launching a new web site and marketing campaign for it in the winter/spring. It seems like a product that is primarily geared for outdoor-types (ski resort, fishing, snowmobilers, boating/yachting, military, etc.), since it is very durable AND waterproof! However, we're trying to see if we cannot try and also get into other markets...such as higher ed, city/area map sales and "destination" properties.

If anyone is interested in talking about SeeBuddee in more detail, let me know via PM/email. Sorry for the "thread hijack!" However, I thought this was a good place to mention that alternative as well, as it is all-about taking big "paper" maps and finding new and convenient ways for packaging them that people will buy and use. B)


Derek.

IMO
This seems more like a novelty product. I will explain...
Maps are about sharing information. So picture yourself on a trail (most of the time you would not be alone) One guy(girl) looks at your SeeBuddee map and says we are here! and we want to go there.... well well how do you show those positions to your mates using SeeBuddee (ironic name) map when you can't regroup over the same view and show things with your finger.
The product might of sold 35000 units in 11 days at the Olypic games. But I assume a lot of novelty products sell by the truck load at these type of events.
I hope others have a more positive opinion. But for me it is a no go.

As another example, I am working on a personal project regarding a local park atlas. At first I wanted be somewhat Mister inovation. So I said I will design a small (4.5 x 8-11 in) format multi page atlas. The layout took me days to achieve. Well because of the large scale I wanted to use the atlas ended up being 70 pages plus. I gathered a few park users and showed them the concept. They ended telling me that having all these pages was going to be a nightmare to use. I will probably end up producing a 2 folded map series of the park.
Again IMO, inovation is only good if your target audience will and can use it. Then again, alot of unuseful things sell (for a while) because of good marketing.
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Derek Tonn

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IMO
This seems more like a novelty product. I will explain...
Maps are about sharing information. So picture yourself on a trail (most of the time you would not be alone) One guy(girl) looks at your SeeBuddee map and says we are here! and we want to go there.... well well how do you show those positions to your mates using SeeBuddee (ironic name) map when you can't regroup over the same view and show things with your finger.


Jacques,

Good post. That is one of the "knocks" on the concept....that it is incredibly tough to show/share what you are looking at with other people. However, it seems to me that the trend has been moving more and more towards "personal" (one-person) mapping solutions rather than maps that multiple people can simultaneously review. Maps on cell phones and PDAs, Garmin, Tom Tom, etc. seem to be the way society is moving.....and we jumped in and took a chance on SeeBuddee for the very-same reason. It might succeed, it might not. However, after 6-9 months of analysis, I thought that the potential benefits of trying to see if we can make a go of the concept (and the new potential clients it gives us access to) outweighed the risk. ;)

I actually just entered the world of people who own a cell phone last week, LOL! I know, I know...I'm WAY behind that technology tsunami that crashed on to shore several years ago. That tiny little screen and small buttons are going to take a LOT of getting used to. However, I can't tell you the number of people I see every day using cell phones and PDAs to review messages, documents, maps, etc. "Small maps" is a HUGE potential growth industry for all of us, but it also forces all of us who design maps to re-think the way that we use text, line width, color, negative space, etc. What looks great at 24" x 30" on paper can turn to mud in a HURRY on of handheld device if one isn't careful.

I don't know if it will be a success or not, but I figured it was worth a try. I do agree, however, that marketing and positioning strategies will likely make or break the concept. They won't sell themselves....but then again, neither do most of the products and services out there in the marketplace. As much as unit sales, however, what I am after is:

1. Exposure within new industries for potential mapping projects. MAPPING project revenue.
2. More of an effort to get involved in the "small maps" trend.
3. Per-unit sales commissions.

I told the developer of the concept that I don't really care if I get ANY mark-up/commission on unit sales (keeping the price point more affordable)....if the concept helps get us an expanded and diversified client base in North America, Europe and Asia. More mapping work is the primary motivation. B)
Derek Tonn
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mapformation, LLC

datonn@mapformation.com
http://www.mapformation.com

#9
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IMO
This seems more like a novelty product. I will explain...
Maps are about sharing information. So picture yourself on a trail (most of the time you would not be alone) One guy(girl) looks at your SeeBuddee map and says we are here! and we want to go there.... well well how do you show those positions to your mates using SeeBuddee (ironic name) map when you can't regroup over the same view and show things with your finger.


Jacques,

I actually just entered the world of people who own a cell phone last week


I am still holding off... on the cell phone.
Bottom line if the product takes off all the better for the mapping industry.

Regards,
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#10
Dennis McClendon

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We've done some work with this company, which produces maps that fold to credit card size:

Xpando Media
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#11
natcase

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We've done some work with this company, which produces maps that fold to credit card size:

Xpando Media


Z-Card. Xpando (we've also worked with both companies). Falk Plan. Fastmap. VanDam. There are a heck of a lot of patent folds out there. And then the new metal cards and SeeBuddy...

Has anyone ever done a comprehensive list of what's out there? Lately we've also seen printers offering non-patent fold-downs. Sorry no names off the top of my head, but I know one was from China.

Does anyone remember a design book from a few years ago about the many many ways things have been designed to be compact: stacking, folding, interlocking, etc. It was a cool book and now I can't find it...

Nat Case
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#12
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We've done some work with this company, which produces maps that fold to credit card size:

Xpando Media


So I guess the term patent pending for the Z-Card is just that.
Because there seems to be a lot of look alikes. All the better.
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#13
robmin

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We've done some work with this company, which produces maps that fold to credit card size:

Xpando Media


I was looking at the various websites of Pocket Media products (z-card, xpandomedia, boris) and found that the xpandomedia site was really informative. The portfolio for regional promotion may be interesting.

http://xpandomedia.c...p;g=regional_en

When looking at their material guide, I see that they also print on nearly indestructible DuPont Tyvek. Has anyone else see tyvek being used for map applications?

Robert Mink
Tandem Marketing Services PL




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