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Adobe Version Cue for managing files and projects

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#1
ELeFevre

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Over the last few days I've started setting up and learning about how to use Adobe's Version Cue utililty that comes bundled with the Creative Suite. I keep secretly hoping that by letting Adobe manage a files development, along with back-ups (Versions), I can reduce the number of corrupt files and general confusion that takes place when you have a multitude of project files, some of them corrupt.

I suspect that most Illustrator files become corrupt during the saving process due to memory errors caused by glows, blurs, shadows, clipping paths, crop boxes and system lag. I also suspect that moving a file to and from folders causes problems. I don't know how Version Cue saves and stores information compared to a regular "save as" or save a copy", but I would hope that the processes used to create Versions and backups are more stable, intelligent, and less dependant upon system memory and processor speed. Wishful thinking, maybe.

So far this is the first post I've seen concerning Version Cue, which I find surprising. From what I've read and done so far with it, it seems promising. I'd really be interested in hearing from those who use Version Cue, are thinking about using it, or who have used it in the past year or so and went back to the old way of managing files.



#2
CHART

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Erin,

Good topic,

I omitted installing VersionCue (shipped with CS). But I think the idea of using it sound interesting on Illustrator Photoshop and InDesign map projects.

I might reinstall and give it go.

Good topic.
Chart

#3
ELeFevre

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For those of you interested in Version Cue, here are a few links to various Adobe PDFs on the subject, all of which are excellent and worth looking at.

Understanding Adobe Version Cue CS2 File Manager

Using Adobe Bridge and Adobe Version Cue to Streamline your workflow

Version Cue CS2: A Workflow Guide



#4
Nick Springer

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I have been using Version Cue for about 2 years at my day job managing all the Adobe files for my team of 4 designers. We couldn't live without it at this point. VC2 with Creative Suite 2 is much improved over VC1, especially with the addition of the Adobe Bridge application which is a window into VC. Make sure you have lots of storage space though, and I recommend a separate machine for VC, for redundancy.

In a nutshell, you have a local copy of all files in your Version Cue folder store (by default in My Documents) that gets updated when you make change to a document and hit "Save." At some point, you need to hit "Save a Version..." which copies the file to the VC server store in a proprietary, compressed, binary format (I think it is an embedded MySQL db). So if the server crashes you still have the latest native file on your local machine. If the local machine dies, you have the last VERSION you saved to the server. Obviously multiple copies of large Illustrator and PSD files can add up quickly, not to mention your local copies.

One major misconception about VC is that you need the VC software on the client machine. You only need it on the VC server box. Of course if you are using the same machine then client=server. On the client all you need is CS or CS2 apps which have the "Save a Version..." command.

Another big benefit is if you have multiple people working on the same file. VC acts like source control, only allowing one person to work on a file at a time, and being a central repository so everyone has access to the latest files.

If anyone has specific questions about VC feel free to ask me offline.

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC





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