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#1
JB Krygier

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The Capitol of Punk site tells the story of punk/hardcore in Washington
DC with maps/video/mashups. The kick-off map vid at the link below
made me happy - the first good thing out of DC in years.

http://yellowarrow.net/capitolofpunk/

via Boing


jk

#2
Mike H

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that's cool - we'll see what Martin has to say, I believe he would be most qualified to chime in as the only true punk-turned-mapmaker I know of.

m.
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#3
Claude

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that's great, i spent many, many late nights at a couple of clubs on that map.
Platts, a div. of McGraw-Hill
www.maps.platts.com


#4
benbakelaar

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do you guys think there is a connection between punk culture and the field of design, which could explain (to me) why there are punk cartographers? :) i know that wasn't the point of the page or the post.. just my own question.

#5
Martin Gamache

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What a coincidence I just happen to be in DC today, the actual capital of harDCore punk as far as I'm concerned ( Bad Brains, Minor Threat, S.O.A. etc...). I'll see if this is useful..... I've seen shows at several locations on this map, stayed on a couch and became a vegetarian at DC space and recorded at Inner ear with Don Zientara....wait a minute Inner Ear isn't on this map...that is a big oversight...

As for any connections, IMO there are def. connections between the art community and the punk/indie rocker scenes in many town. The same people that show up at shows, are the ones in local bands, and running small galleries and creating cool art and that has held true for everywhere I've lived. Whether they still are involved in the "scene" as they get older and more sucessful is another story but they tend to come out of it and be shaped by it. My DIY ethics definitely came from the DC Punk scene of the 80's and 90's and permitted to even conceive of making maps when I really didn't know what I was doing...


mg

#6
ELeFevre

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I'm not sure there is a direct link between punk culture and cartography, but there is certainly a connection between graphic design and punk rock culture (which is why you could have a handful of punk rock cartographers out there). From my experience growing up in the 80's and having been involved in the punk rock community during that time, when the first Apple computer appeared in one my high-school art classes around (1988-90?), we were still creating tape covers, 7" record covers, flyers, and zines using scissors, glue, copy machines, pens and markers....everyone was. The transition into the computerized design world was a no-brainer. Fifteen/twenty years later, nearly all of my friends who received there initial design experience in the punk community are now professional art directors, web designers, graphic artists, and in my case, cartographer. I doubt I would be doing what I do today if I had not been involved in the punk community as a teenager.



#7
Rob

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interesting mash up and discussion. I never linked the two in my head before, but like Mr. Erin, in 1988 my family got our first mac, and I can remember spending hours in the paint program trying to perfectly recreate the logos of DRI, MDC, and all those other three letter acronym bands. Oh how I loved punk back then; dead milkmen was my first concert ever, I was probably 12 or 13... I was into metal too so recreating Iron Maiden and Metallica took up some design time as well. so yeah, punk/metal music was my introduction to computer graphics and thus cartography as well... very interesting connection I hadn't even realized. will have to point out to the folks that something good finally came from "all that yelling and loud music" down the hallway... thanks jk.

#8
Geographic Techniques

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Great discussion. I don't think that it is necessarily a mapping-punk link, but generally an appreciation of one art form to another. I'm sure you'll find mappers heavily into country, folk (as with that earlier NYC link), classical, etc., or casually into it all. However, it is interesting that I was fairly heavy into punk during my early academic years (late 70's-early 80's), listening to sorts like Echo and the Bunnymen, Boomtown Rats, Dead Kennedy's, Talking Heads, the Clash, and being slammed danced into U2's stage at the small venue Headliners in Madison, WI, in 1982. After those weekend excursions it was actually a pleasure getting away from it all, focusing on studies, and drawing maps and graphics (yes, by hand).

Being a bit older now, and somewhat more conservative (more classical radio and NPR), I do find myself craving those "oldies" and even buying up [again] some of those punk records on CD's. If I had to choose, I probably, owe much, if any, of my creativity to Patty Smith.

Doug
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www.geotechmap.com




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