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#31
oldtoby

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Yup, that's pretty dense! I like the use of the coloured bullets in the lists, but I've never been a fan of halos around names. Curious -- what's the work flow? Surely you didn't have to type all these names. :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com



Well I use the halo as sparingly as i can, only when theres an issue with readability. Yeah I like to use colored bullets too, I cant tell you how often i see maps with multiple bullet lists in proximity that are all the same color, making it hard to tell which street each bullet belongs too. As far as workflow, using the Arctools command line program I generate coverages and then use a couple of AML scripts to export the coverages and any annotation to .ai files, which I then work in Freehand. The for the annotation .ai file each street name (for example) is one text block (it doesnt curve or follow the linework) that is about 2.5 pt font size (easier to work with like that). So in freehand i basically have to take each text block, size it up to the right size and then move it to the proper position. (splitting the block into multiple parts, attaching to curve, or duplicating for long streets as needed)

#32
David Medeiros

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Surely you didn't have to type all these names. :rolleyes:

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


When working at CSAA on a new map coverage we would have to type every label... twice, once on the map side and once for the index. Thousands of labels, hundreds of knockouts... two sore wrists.

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GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#33
Charles Syrett

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I'm familiar with that kind of workflow, though I avoid using Arc (too big and fancy for most of the work I do). In fact, I just recently did a project that had been set up that way (2.5 pt names Arc>AI), though I had to keep everything in AI at the client's request. If I had brought it into FreeHand, I'm sure I would have finished it in half the time! :rolleyes:

Though I don't particularly like halos, I'll admit they're sometimes necessary, as I think they are in your sample. But there's always the nagging feeling that the need for halos points to some weakness in overall design. Usually it's because of the use of solid black lines, which can almost always be avoided (and could even be seen as a leftover from the old pen-and-ink days, when almost all linework was done in black).

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

Well I use the halo as sparingly as i can, only when theres an issue with readability. Yeah I like to use colored bullets too, I cant tell you how often i see maps with multiple bullet lists in proximity that are all the same color, making it hard to tell which street each bullet belongs too. As far as workflow, using the Arctools command line program I generate coverages and then use a couple of AML scripts to export the coverages and any annotation to .ai files, which I then work in Freehand. The for the annotation .ai file each street name (for example) is one text block (it doesnt curve or follow the linework) that is about 2.5 pt font size (easier to work with like that). So in freehand i basically have to take each text block, size it up to the right size and then move it to the proper position. (splitting the block into multiple parts, attaching to curve, or duplicating for long streets as needed)



#34
Charles Syrett

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When working at CSAA on a new map coverage we would have to type every label... twice, once on the map side and once for the index. Thousands of labels, hundreds of knockouts... two sore wrists.


Worth it though -- right? Map Bliss? :P

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com

#35
David Medeiros

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When working at CSAA on a new map coverage we would have to type every label... twice, once on the map side and once for the index. Thousands of labels, hundreds of knockouts... two sore wrists.


Worth it though -- right? Map Bliss? :P

Charles Syrett
Map Graphics
http://www.mapgraphics.com


Lol, :D I need to change that name, it's a through back to when I was doing wedding maps as a side gig to the CSAA stuff.

It was worth it, I learned a lot about traditional cartography from those guys. For me it was more like doing manual cartography on a computer which is why I sometimes refer to my work as a traditional digital cartography. Still, I'm not anxious to label an entire map that way anytime soon ;)

GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

 

www.mapbliss.com

 


#36
oldtoby

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But there's always the nagging feeling that the need for halos points to some weakness in overall design.


I cant disagree there. We were able to significantly reduce the amount of halos (Inline effect in Freehand parlance ;) ) needed on our maps when we lightened up the colors on our railroad lines, city limits stroke and water outer stroke. On the other hand there is a reluctance to change other styles that we have been using for years as it makes the maps a little less user friendly.

Oh, yeah, I really dislike Illustrator too, Freehand seems to be to be much more user friendly and logical in how it works especially with text blocks.




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