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#1
Mike Breiding

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Not sure if this is the place to post such a question, but...

Can anyone give me any guidence on giving estimates/quotes for a recreational trails map project.

Before I post any details I want to be sure this question is appropriate for this forum.

Thanks,
-Mike

#2
benbakelaar

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Hans will transfer it to the right forum if necessary.

My only advice is, take your personal estimate of how much time it would take you to complete, uninterrupted. Add 50% to that for tweaks and changes. And then take that new number and double it... to cover meetings, change in plans, shifts in emphasis, and the sometimes inevitable "This is what you asked for. But it's not what you want?" :)

Of course, within reason. I wouldn't double 100 hours to 200. But then again, there are many more experienced consultants than me on this board. We'll let them speak.

I prefer to work hourly, with a maximum number of hours agreed upon. That way, the client can feel comfortable that the costs won't get out of hand, but you can charge for the work that you do.

#3
Nick Springer

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I posted on this a long time ago: http://www.cartotalk...w=findpost&p=22

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#4
merft

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Can anyone give me any guidence on giving estimates/quotes for a recreational trails map project.


Providing estimates takes time and experience. Regardless, always track the time your invest into projects, so you can get a feel of what it will take in the future. If you quote a project at 40 hours and it took 60. Next time you will know.

To quote projects I:

1) Estimate the hours I would expect to compile the base materials, without labels.
2) Estimate the hours it will take to label all the features. Be careful here because this is where the majority of my time usually falls.
3) Multiply the hours you have estimated by your hourly rate. Then I typically added +25% for client indecision/changes.
4) Quote printing separately from custom cartography services. Printing will usually will cost more than the custom cartography, especially on short-quantity press runs.
5) Prepare a detailed quote. I have attached a sample of what I tend to use for quotes. Be detailed on the scope of work and stick to it. Don't let the client make scope changes on the project without an Add Services agreement. Be detailed about what your deliverables will be. Digital, print, etc.

I would also recommend getting a copy of the Graphic Artist Guild Pricing and Ethical Guildelines. You can find it in most bookstores.

Just remember that you WILL make under and over estimates as you start out. We have all done it. But over time you will get better if you track what projects actually required.

Good Luck,
-Tom

Attached Files



#5
Martin Gamache

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Tom,

Thanks for posting that.

I have a form I use alot and modify as needed, but there were several usefuls bits I may borrow from you.

I would advise anyone looking at Tom's form to consider whetehr you are only licensing vs. selling "all rights" to a map. This affects pricing, but also ownership of artwork. And should be clear in the contact or quote for service.

mg

#6
Mike Breiding

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Can anyone give me any guidence on giving estimates/quotes for a recreational trails map project.


Providing estimates takes time and experience. Regardless, always track the time your invest into projects, so you can get a feel of what it will take in the future. If you quote a project at 40 hours and it took 60. Next time you will know.

To quote projects I:

1) Estimate the hours I would expect to compile the base materials, without labels.
2) Estimate the hours it will take to label all the features. Be careful here because this is where the majority of my time usually falls.
3) Multiply the hours you have estimated by your hourly rate. Then I typically added +25% for client indecision/changes.
4) Quote printing separately from custom cartography services. Printing will usually will cost more than the custom cartography, especially on short-quantity press runs.
5) Prepare a detailed quote. I have attached a sample of what I tend to use for quotes. Be detailed on the scope of work and stick to it. Don't let the client make scope changes on the project without an Add Services agreement. Be detailed about what your deliverables will be. Digital, print, etc.

I would also recommend getting a copy of the Graphic Artist Guild Pricing and Ethical Guildelines. You can find it in most bookstores.

Just remember that you WILL make under and over estimates as you start out. We have all done it. But over time you will get better if you track what projects actually required.

Good Luck,
-Tom

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Greetings,
Thanks for posting the quote and to everyone else who offered suggestions.
One of my quandaries is what to charge for an hourly rate.
If any of you can privately mail me with your hourly rate, it would help.
Are rates the same for all tasks?

Also, I usually only have one or two projects a year so it makes it difficult to base a current quote on previous ones. Especiailly since I am lousy at tracking my hours.
If my livelihood depended on it I would be better at it.

Below is what the project entails.
All of the data except the trails is in public domain and already in my possesion.
I am to produce an EPS of the map only. All other content for the brochure will be provided by others.

Thanks to all,
-Mike

--------------------------------
Coopers Rock State Forest Recreation Map

Data Collection:
GPS 73 Miles of Trails

State boundary
County boundary
Forest 7 WMA boundary ( 12, 000 acres)
All road classes
All water features
All trail types with calculated lengths and distance between trail intersections
Trail intersection markers
POIs (Points of Interest)
Structures
Bridges
Gates
Utility right-of-ways

All of the above will be labelled.

Additional maps to be created:
Area map of Mid Atlantic region with pointer for CRSF
Area map of North Central West Virginia showing CRSF

Map Layout would contain all, but not be limited to the following features.
Scale bar
Full legend
North arrow

Output Format:
PSD for use in Desktop Publishing
PFD for electronic distribution

#7
David T

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I'm in a similar situation. I have a full time job, and do work on the side. I only do a couple of jobs a year, and I'm fine with that.

What you have to decide, is how much is your time worth. If you've figured out how many hours it's going to take to get the job done, then ask yourself - how much do you want to make for working that many hours? Then figure out the hourly rate that way.

That's what has worked for me in the past.

In fact, I do that with other aspects of my life, too. When I'm judging what my time is worth, compared to how much time a task will cost me, I figure out if it's better to do it myself, or pay someone else to do it.

For instance, my gardner charges me $70 a month to come once a week and more the lawn, and do some weeding. Since I've never worked a lawn mower in my life, and I'd rather have the free time (whether to spend with family, work around the house, goof off, or freelance). I know I'd spend more time (and frustration) mowing the lawn then it costs me to pay him to come once a week. My time is worth more than $17.50 an hour.

I even use this philosophy when it comes to flying vs driving. You don't realize how much you're 'spending' when it's not cold hard cash, but, you really incuring cost whenever you do anything. Is it 'cheaper' to fly to a destination, and be there quicker (and be without a vehicle), or is it 'cheaper' to pay for gas, have your vehicle, spend the time in the car, etc.

Good luck.
David Toney, GISP
GIS Manager
United States Marine Corps
West Coast Installations




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