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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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I'm currently working on a map that is going to be printed and then coated with a transparent plastic film. The film darkens the colors slightly and my client wants to have some control over the final color (i.e. edit colors in Photoshop). As far as I can tell the only practical way to do this is work the brightness in Photoshop, which will affect the entire image. Since it's an elevation map, I'm not really in favor of using discrete colors (which would make the per-color editing easier in Photoshop). Any thoughts/suggestions on this?
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#2
Nick Springer

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You could use an Brightness/Contrast or Curves Adjustment Layer just above and grouped with your elevation colors layer. Than this adjustment layer can be modified as many times as you need while still maintaining the original color data in the elevation layer.

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#3
Hans van der Maarel

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Nick,

Thanks for the tip, I'll give that a try.

Limiting factor is that the final image is going to be *huge*. Think 15000x7500 pixels, something in that direction.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#4
Nick Springer

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As long as you have lots of RAM, that shouldn't be a problem.

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#5
Rob

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Hans,

I just had a larger format (Arch D) map mounted on foam core and laminated. I'm not sure of the specific laminate used, but I didn't notice any color shift, at least that I could tell. If anything, the gloss of the laminate made the whole project look much sharper. Colors where still very vibrant, and everyone was pretty stoked on it. good luck. rob

#6
Hans van der Maarel

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Nick,

Well, the client would be doing most of the correction, so it's all up to them. I just want to make sure it's technically possible.

Rob,

Again, the client is taking care of the film. They mentioned the color-shift from previous experiences.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#7
Rick Dey

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A lot of the color shift is going to be a matter of the quality of stock that the map is printed on. A good quality coated stock will exhibit much less color change than a lightweight uncoated stock. Trying to compensate for a cheap paper by coating or laminate will not gve superior results. It would be wise for the client to contact their printer and whoever will be doing the finish work for recommendations. A little communication with all involved in the process early on will help everyone.
Rick Dey

#8
Hans van der Maarel

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Since they're only about an hour's driving away (international client even, I'm close to the Belgian border), I think it's probabely best if I try and go over there and see if they can do some sample prints for me.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#9
Nick Springer

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My experience years ago doing high-end print work for annual reports showed me clearly that you really can't represent the interactions of paper and ink digitally, and in the end you always need to go and monitor the press process if you want to get an exact result that matches your expectations.

There is no substitution for an actual press check.

Nick Springer

Director of Design and Web Applications: ALK Technologies Inc.
Owner: Springer Cartographics LLC


#10
Lui

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We are always monitoring map printing. Maybe it is not realy necessary in standard CMYK printing, but it is crucial in spot color printing (color and position corrections). Monitoring is most of the time fun, but it can be a really painfull when something doesn't fit.

Lui

#11
Matthew Hampton

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A good/bad press operator can make a huge difference in how a piece turns out. It's a completely different realm of manipulation, but can adds lots of value to a finished piece. At press you can not only adjust CMYK and PMS values (although only in the width of the press swath), but also in the pressure of the imprint.

I just recently went to a press check for a regional bike map I made, and the operator was able to tweak several things to my satisfaction.

It opens another world to cartography.
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Matthew

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#12
melon_mapper

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I agree that if you have the means go to a press run. When I was with the USGS we did alot of press runs and you learn quite a lot about the printing process, but it can also help in the design process. Even though it may have been a little late, we also occasionally found errors, some that could be corrected on the negatives before the printing plates where created ( I know I am dating myself)




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