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Help: John Speed 1612

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#1
Solomon

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Hello!

I have joined as I hope a member here could advise me: I need to see a fullsize section of John Speed's map of Norfolk, 1612.
This is the full map:

Posted Image

The section I need fullsize is:

Posted Image

Actually, I'd be interested to see any map of that area, from any early period, as well as a modern geological map.

If you could either help, or advise, I'd appreciate it.

#2
Hans van der Maarel

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I've moved this one to the appropriate section.
Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
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#3
benbakelaar

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You should search the David Rumsey Historical Map collection, fully indexed and available online.

www.davidrumsey.com/

Also the University of Texas has a huge online maps collection, and the New York Public Library as well, although both of those resources are not necessarily high-resolution.

Good luck, are you treasure hunting or something?

#4
Matthew Hampton

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I don't think Rumsey has this one. Where did you get this graphic? I found a place to get a reproduction.

co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#5
Solomon

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Many thanks for those pieces of advice.

Treasure hunter? Sort of... I am an archaeologist, but too ill to move at the mo', so I am researching from bed with my laptop. Annoying, having to ask for documents.

The maps I have found are therefore all online. None are full size, which is why I asked if anyone here could find the map, scan it and send me the section I need.

This particular area has changed dramatically over time. The Romans built embankments defining the estuary, then the Dutch built a wall across and drained the estuary making today's fine farmland. Three rivers flowed into the estuary, changing course with flooding and now combined into one, the Nene. What I am trying to do is understand where it flowed in the middle ages, speifically the 13th century.

I am also looking into storm surges there. I have heard that one may have taken place in Frisia in 1216, but England has no record of that. Yet if right, it must have impacted the English coast and The Wash - North Sea storm surges always do.

Because the land is now drained, there is no known archaeology across the estuary, so I am curious as to what may lie deep under. Unless or until geophys surveys are conducted (none yet) the answer seems to lie in cartography. Which brings me here.

Geological charts would be useful, too :)

Thanks again!

#6
benbakelaar

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Ah I see.... well using Google image search, there are a few historical maps that pop up. Here's one from 1830, don't know if it will help you much, looks mainly political.

http://www.cru.uea.a...folk/oldmap.htm

#7
benbakelaar

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Here's a site that mentions a "Norfolk County Council E-map Explorer" with some satellite imagery.

http://cres1.lancs.a...sages/20818.htm

#8
Solomon

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Here's a site that mentions a "Norfolk County Council E-map Explorer" with some satellite imagery.

http://cres1.lancs.a...sages/20818.htm

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Now that's really quite useful. Many thanks.

#9
benbakelaar

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Norfolk - Saxton's map of 1574

http://www.oldnorfol...saxton-1574.htm

#10
Solomon

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Thanks - that's as early as I think we're going to get.

Interesting that the cartography of Saxton's map of 1574 seems to be identical to that of Speed's map of 1612, though the surrounding artwork is different. Makes me wonder who was doing what.




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