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#1
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Hi:

A newbie here.

I was wondering if anyone could offer suggestions of the best software for me to purchase. The method I have used in school a few years back is going from ArcView3.2 shp files to Freehand 10 with MapPublisher for final cartography.

I was thinking of buying the Manifold software, combining it with Freehand MX (is this a good combo?) I don't have any experience with Illustrator, it seems alot of people use it, is it compareable to Freehand?

Thanks for all suggestions

#2
Dennis McClendon

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I continue to be a big FreeHand fan, but its long-term future is cloudy. Adobe was permitted to purchase it last year, and their commitment to future upgrades is weak if not nonexistent.

If you're starting from scratch, my reluctant advice would be to learn Illustrator.
Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
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#3
ELeFevre

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If you're starting from scratch, my reluctant advice would be to learn Illustrator.


I would have to reluctantly agree as well. Even though I am also a Freehand fan, I think the Illustrator interface is little more user friendly and intutive, not to mention it's wide use by so many industries. Since you already have experience with Freehand MX, go ahead and learn both. You'll be better off for doing it.
As far as a GIS, Manifold is great choice.



#4
l.jegou

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I was a CorelDRAW user for many years (from Corel2 to Corel11, yikes), and from despair i switched to the less user-friendly interface of Illustrator 9.

Since then, after a little adaptation, i greatly appreciate the exactness, precision, and the time i gained. Illustrator produce directly PDF's, and i like the total control you have on the final product.

But i'm looking forward to have a couple more fingers grafted, Adobe softwares are so keyboard-shortcuts heavy ;)

#5
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But i'm looking forward to have a couple more fingers grafted, Adobe softwares are so keyboard-shortcuts heavy ;)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Which is a good thing, right?
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#6
l.jegou

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Which is a good thing, right?


Yes, keyboard shortcuts are a more efficient way to use software, but it's somewhat long to learn to use them, especially when they're numerous as in Illustrator, and incoherent between softwares of the same family :)

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Which is a good thing, right?


Yes, keyboard shortcuts are a more efficient way to use software, but it's somewhat long to learn to use them, especially when they're numerous as in Illustrator, and incoherent between softwares of the same family :)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


They are customizable for a reason.

#8
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If you're starting from scratch, my reluctant advice would be to learn Illustrator.


I would have to reluctantly agree as well. Even though I am also a Freehand fan, I think the Illustrator interface is little more user friendly and intutive, not to mention it's wide use by so many industries. Since you already have experience with Freehand MX, go ahead and learn both. You'll be better off for doing it.
As far as a GIS, Manifold is great choice.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Is it necessary to have GIS software such as Manifold/ArcMap as well as MaPublisher and Illustrator?

Is the GIS software just for processing/analyzing data or can you do that in MaPublisher?

Would you trust getting any of these software packages of a websites such as Ebay or others like it?

Thanks--

#9
Derek Tonn

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I was a CorelDRAW user for many years (from Corel2 to Corel11, yikes), and from despair i switched to the less user-friendly interface of Illustrator 9.

Since then, after a little adaptation, i greatly appreciate the exactness, precision, and the time i gained. Illustrator produce directly PDF's, and i like the total control you have on the final product.

But i'm looking forward to have a couple more fingers grafted, Adobe softwares are so keyboard-shortcuts heavy ;)


I've been tempted to move to AI over Corel Draw as well, since the VAST majority of our clients are working in the AI CS/CS2 suite. However, Corel Draw X3 has kicked those thoughts to the curb for me. WOW! The AutoTrace and intuitive on-the-fly cropping of vector artwork reminds me of why I elected to work in Corel Draw since WAY back in versions 2-3. If only Corel did more to provide support on the Mac and/or at least 1-2 colleges out there would give Corel a try instead of ordering the AI suite.

Corel Rave isn't worth the time compared to Flash, and PhotoPaint is serviceable, but still no Photoshop! However, their Draw program beats Illustrator, in my opinion, hands down. My $0.02.

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#10
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I agree, Derek, CorelDraw is an impressive program that rivals both Illustrator and Freehand. Too bad the rest of Corel's products are lagging behind in the design world. Without a solid suite of design products like Adobe has, I don't see the status of CorelDraw changing much in the near future.






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