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#1
frax

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Have I asked this before? I am working on an illustration now, and I just wanted to try this "fade the unrelated things into the background".

I was experimenting a bit with blends, but I couldn't get anything to work really well...

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Hugo Ahlenius
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#2
frax

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ok, got it after some more research, the trick is to use an opacity mask, right? I was looking for something related to blends...

Here was what helped me on the right track: http://www.adobe.com...fs/0009qaai.pdf
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#3
ELeFevre

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Frax,
You've got it...

Select the objects you want to fade and apply a gradient. You can adjust the gradient direction with the Gradient tool in the toolbar to finalize the effect. A little transparency adjustment might help as well or maybe even a slight blur.

You could also apply a gradient to the stroke on the same objects.

this can be done by selecting the objects you want to fade, go to Path: Outline Stroke. Select the new path with the direct selection tool (your new path will be grouped) and apply a gradient to the stroke. If you've applied any appearance attributes then you will need to expand the appearances before hand.

I'm sure there are quite a few diferent ways to do this. Anyone else?



#4
Martin Gamache

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These are the kind of effects best built in Photoshop, especially if you will be going to offset print.

Best to be careful and head off to raster land.


You should show us the finished product.

#5
frax

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Martin, what you are suggesting is rasterizing the whole map and then applying it in Photoshop -- I can see that workflow being easier in a way, since using opacity masks/gradients etc would have to be prepared for each layer - that way one need to only do it once (but it would be harder go back if one needs to make a smaller update).

I ended up not using this effect - I only wanted to try it. This also got me into the land of gradient mesh, another thing that I haven't experimented with before...

Related to Photoshop - a quick and dirty workaround that I have used before is to have a raster layer that has transparent to white gradients and I have just put them over the vector art.
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#6
Martin Gamache

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Martin, what you are suggesting is rasterizing the whole map and then applying it in Photoshop -- I can see that workflow being easier in a way, since using opacity masks/gradients etc would have to be prepared for each layer - that way one need to only do it once (but it would be harder go back if one needs to make a smaller update).

I ended up not using this effect - I only wanted to try it. This also got me into the land of gradient mesh, another thing that I haven't experimented with before...

Related to Photoshop - a quick and dirty workaround that I have used before is to have a raster layer that has transparent to white gradients and I have just put them over the vector art.

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Hugo,

Your last idea is a good one. But also sometimes you just need to rasterize some of the layers. I just don't trust raster effects in Illustrator as rule. Too many things that can go wrong.

#7
frax

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instead of fiddling with masks/gradients on each layer, one could actually do a fade-to-white layer (using opacity maks) and have that on top of the other ones.
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