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Help ID projection for 1930s maps of China (made by Japan)?

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#1
David Medeiros

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Hi all, I need a little help determining the possible coordinate system for a set of 1930s topographic maps of the Shanghai area. The maps were drawn by the Japanese for parts of China. Date for this particular set is 1932 - 1937, scale 1:25,000. 

 

What we are doing is creating index grids for these map sets (see here for other sets already online), the index is hosted online and links the user back to the digital scan and metadata record on the library site. Most of these maps have both scale and corner coordinates indicated making a fishnet easy to create in ArcGIS to replicate the index. These maps of China however have no indication of coordinates or projection that I can find.

 

The substitute approach has been to georeference one map scan and build the index off that, but despite getting a good match for the scan, the index's quickly get out of alignment with the scans, so clicking on an edge box in the index gives you a scan that may not fully match what the index map online shows.

 

I think this may be partly due to the fact that we can't determine a best match for a modern projection in ArcGIS to use with these older maps.

 

I know there are some users here with VERY good projection sleuthing skills, hoping I can get one of you to take a look at this map and see if you can guess it's projection?

 

https://purl.stanford.edu/qx068zf0175


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

www.mapbliss.com
@mapbliss

#2
SteveR

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I may be wrong, David, but it looks to me like something similar to a UTM grid.  I'm aware that many countries have their own metric grid with the Y axis having more numbers than the X axis to avoid confusion over which coordinate is which.  I went to school in Switzerland and was told that Switzerland has its own metric grid whose origin is in a vineyard in France.

 

Steve Richardson



#3
Strebe

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There is nothing to go on. The grid lines are just that: a square grid, with no reference to latitude and longitude. Determining what projection would be a research project requiring ascertaining the real coordinates of features that you are able to identify unambiguously, reconstructing the graticule from that, and then searching from among some projection candidates plausible for the period and place.

 

— daan



#4
david17tym

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Hi Dave,

You might like to check out the always excellent Grids and Datums resource written by Cliff Mugnier:

http://www.asprs.org...-2000-china.pdf

He mentions a Japanese grid system established in 1933 with an origin.

Not able to confirm because I can't translate the town name to the west.

Dave






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