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Stuck on a Complex Map

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#1
Daniel Huffman

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I'm working on mapping some complex ecological data for a client, and I'm a bit stuck at present on how to try and get it done.

 

Basically, there are a series of zones. Each zone can have one or two activities. For example (these are birds in this case): wintering and molting.

 

Each zone also has an associated season or, sometimes, two seasons.

 

The zones can overlap.

 

 

In the attached example, the green/brown striped zone indicates that this zone is used in the spring & fall. Inside it, you can see a smaller zone. This zone is used for a different activity, in the spring only. So, really, I need to somehow indicate that the larger area is Activity #1 in Spring & Fall, and the smaller inside zone is Activity #2 in the Spring, while still overlapping with Activity #1 Spring/Fall.

 

This sort of overlap complexity is going to happen a lot, as I'll be making a number of these maps.

 

My intent at this stage, which the client is satisfied with, is to offload the symbology for activity into just text. So, I will add annotations pointing to the zones to clarify what activity is happening.

 

I may try flipping the whole scheme, color coding by activity and then labeling with the season, instead, but I think I'll still have similarly complex overlaps.

 

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  • Screen Shot 2016-05-12 at 12.19.12 PM.png


#2
AndyM

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My intent at this stage, which the client is satisfied with, is to offload the symbology for activity into just text.

 

Good idea: this type of data, with overlapping zones, overlapping attributes, and the temporal element, can be a horror to map.

 

 

This may be overkill, but check out the "how to read these maps" section  PDF pages 57-60 (the printed pages are numbered 49-52)  of this atlas http://publications....ublication.html  (sorry, it's 30Mb).

 

We started by looking at the NOAA ESI standards  http://response.rest...x-esi-maps.html

 

 



#3
Daniel Huffman

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Thanks! I've got one idea I'm working on now, but I think I'm going to pursue something down the line you suggested as an alternative. Could be some good stuff there. Much appreciated!



#4
Dennis McClendon

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Over the weekend, I pulled out an old Oxford World Atlas, which uses some interesting techniques to represent several overlapping variables:

 

3mrYpIr.jpg

 

On Tuesday, a client asked me to represent up to four different overlapping jurisdictions, which I'll be trying to do entirely with colors and keep them subtle enough to be background information.  I'll post what I come up with.


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Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com




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