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#1
Hans van der Maarel

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Hi,

 

I'm working on a map, in Adobe Illustrator, for road cyclists in the hilly part of The Netherlands (waits for the laughter to die down...)

 

So for a number of hills I calculated the gradient along % short segments of the route and I'm struggling a bit with how to display that. I'm using MAPublisher to style based on the gradient %, in 5% increments

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-09 at 14.06.03.png

 

Left is without end caps, center is with round end caps, right is with square end caps. Neither of those looks visually appealing to be honest.

 

I've now created Voronoi polygons for the centerpoints of my segments then clipped them to a buffer, all with FME, yielding this result:

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-09 at 14.30.04.png

 

Works for now, but I was wondering if there's a way to achieve the same look with just Illustrator (and preferably while retaining MAPublisher attributes).

 

 


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#2
Adam Wilbert

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could you do it by stacking another copy of the style in the appearance panel? Or just duplicate the layer. Set the bottom version to round end caps and the top version to no caps.

 

In my mind, it seems like that would allow the rounded version to fill in the gaps around the outside corners but still get the straight joins between colors. 


Adam Wilbert

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#3
Hans van der Maarel

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Thanks Adam, I tried the second option (the first one, stacking strokes, would still have the end cap of one line overlapping the next one), but alas:

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-10 at 12.25.12.png

 

I think I'm still stuck with overlapping parts of the style which I really don't want, which at least my FME solution manages to overcome.

 

 

 

 


Hans van der Maarel - Cartotalk Editor
Red Geographics
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#4
Matthew Hampton

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I wonder how much clean-up you would have if you converted to outlines and used a Pathfinder operation on multiple layers? : )


co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#5
Adam Wilbert

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Hmm... it worked out much better in my head than in real life. :)

Because of the way the joins between colors miter, i think polygons are going to need to stay involved. Does exporting the veroni polygons and doing the buffer+clip step in illustrator with a clipping mask get you anywhere?

I'll throw out an absurd idea as well: use a meticuloulsy customized gradient?

Adam Wilbert

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#6
hasecbinusr

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What about splitting the visualization into several layers?  Try this, with the layers stacked in this order?

 

- Continous segments as applicable, style in red, without end caps, X px wide

- Continous segments as applicable, style in orange, without end caps, X px wide

- Continous segments as applicable, style in yellow, without end caps, X px wide

- Continous route line, styled in green, without end caps, X px wide

 

The problem is coming in because your route is segmented into multiple short lines. You need to join like segments to fix this, and then apply a base line to fill in the gaps at corners. 



#7
Hans van der Maarel

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Hmm... it worked out much better in my head than in real life. :)

 

That does sum up my cartographic endeavours quite nicely ;)

 

@Matthew: I think, if I understand you correctly, that that's what my Voronoi polygons are more or less

 

@hasecbinusr:

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-13 at 14.31.20.png

 

Nope, I'm afraid that won't work either.

 

Yes, the multiple short segments are making this more difficult, but I feel I need to have them so I can convey a bit more information about how the climb is laid out. Average gradients calculated over longer segments tend to hide information, such as short but steep sections which are what determines whether or not a climb is "difficult" or not.


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#8
Unit Seven

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First time posting up here in a while but might have something to offer - while there's something nice in doing the coloured lines to solve this problem for a cycle map I went with > for small raise >> for moderate and >>> for steep.

 

Part of the reason was we were using line colour to classify the danger or difficulty of the road but this did allow us in areas where there are too many different gradients to show then we could just show the highest. Workwed well and could work well for your application too maybe. Merge on gradient, break to a max X metres long per line, drop  line to centre point with angle of line at that centre point. Label and where point clash drop off the lesser one.

 

Just to turn your whole idea on it's head :)

 

Cheers,

S.


S a m B r o w n

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#9
Hans van der Maarel

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I did consider that idea (and haven't discounted it alltogether). I like my method because it's coming up with hard results. Red means 15% and steeper (and in my case that means: "suffer, a lot". Also, it shows which parts of the climb are steeper than others, I think it'd be hard to achieve that with the chevron-method.

 

As the intented platform is Avenza Maps I am also working on a KML with additional information, which can hopefully include a profile.


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