Jump to content

 
Photo

Nehalem Bay Wall Map

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1
Josh Clague

Josh Clague

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • United States

My intention in creating this map was to document a place with sentimental value to me and my family, but that I can't visit very often. I will be framing a copy for my wall, and perhaps sharing it with my extended family as well. I would appreciate knowing your first impressions and suggestions for anything that could be improved, particularly considering it's purpose as a general reference map.

 

In terms of workflow, I used ArcMap for initial data organization and symbology, Illustrator for a few additional vector artwork features, and Photoshop to finesse a few of the layers and for final map production.

Attached Thumbnails

  • NB1.jpg
  • NB2.jpg

  • Justin and Mike Boruta like this

#2
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,310 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

Really well done. Great color palette. Lots of nice subtle details like river and near shore shading. On the inset there's a spot where Tideland Rd. passes under 101. I'd add bridge ticks to id that as an underpass and not a dead end. I know you have a "knock-out" line behind the hwy, but it could be confused with roads that end on either side of the hwy, unless they do?

 

Only other thing I noticed was the hwy symbols. They look fine, but I'm not sure they need the black box to case them.

 

Are you going to post this to the Avenza PDF Map store? Might not get a lot of downloads but I'd use it next time I drive up!


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

www.mapbliss.com
@mapbliss

#3
zstanley

zstanley

    Newbie

  • Validated Member
  • Pip
  • 2 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:San Francisco, CA
  • Interests:My kids, Music, Cycling, Nature, Maps.
  • United States

Very nice!



#4
tangnar

tangnar

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 137 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Carolina
  • Interests:Rivers, Urban Design, Geomorphology, Bicycling, Outdoors
  • United States

Very nice map! It looks great. 

 

Do the state parks have other amenities (ex camping) that you might want to symbolize for someone not familiar with the area?  



#5
Kate Leroux

Kate Leroux

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 71 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Seattle, WA
  • United States

Lovely! 

 

One minor thing I noticed: the street names are in all caps except the ordinals (4th ST). Was that an intentional choice? 



#6
Matthew Hampton

Matthew Hampton

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Interests:Playing in the mountains and rivers.
  • United States

Very nice map! I really like the softer antique palette and your color choice for the tidal flats. Your background blur for the legend and title are spot on - pulls me right in.

 

The Conservation area that Alder Creek runs through has a gradient fill (or is it feathered text on 'Creek'?) that doesn't look consistent across the map. 


co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#7
david17tym

david17tym

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 123 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:North Wales
  • United Kingdom

Beautiful work Josh



#8
Josh Clague

Josh Clague

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • United States

Thank you all for the constructive feedback!  After working in a vacuum up until now, it's nice to hear from experienced cartographers. I will definitely be addressing all of the changes mentioned, except the street labels - I can't make up my mind about that one.  Using all caps for numbered streets just looked so strange, but the alternative (which I've used) is only slightly better to my eye.  I would love to know what others think.  I'm not sure if there's a convention I'm violating!



#9
DogwoodGeo

DogwoodGeo

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • United States

 Your background blur for the legend and title are spot on - pulls me right in.

 

 

 

I agree with Mathew.  I've gone for that effect in some of my legends before without as much success as you have here.  Very good!



#10
DogwoodGeo

DogwoodGeo

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • United States

Josh, could you share how you created that "softer antique palette" in conjunction with the shaded relief?  A friend is moving to NM and she asked me for a map and I would like to borrow (i.e., steal) that design.  your design is really awesome. I love shaded reliefs but i am totally lacking in that skill set.



#11
Josh Clague

Josh Clague

    Newbie

  • New Member
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • United States

DogwoodGeo:

 

Not sure which aspect of the palette you're looking for, but the overall map was the result of a lot of trail and error. I can, however, give you a few details about the hillshade.

 

In ArcGIS, I created my own hillshade from a 10-meter DEM.  Instead of using the default altitude of 45, I changed it to 75 (I left the default azimuth at 315). On most maps I like this configuration better than the defaults because it seems to provide a more realistic "depth" to the hillshade, while creating shadows that are at the same time more detailed and less harsh (i.e. dark).

 

When applying a color ramp to the new hillshade raster layer, instead of using the white-to-black gradient, in this case I used a white-to-brown gradient that gave it a little color, albeit subtle.

 

Finally, I made the hillshade layer 10% transparent and added a brown background beneath it to give the overall map that cream-colored hue.

 

I hope this helps.  Good luck!



#12
Matthew Hampton

Matthew Hampton

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Interests:Playing in the mountains and rivers.
  • United States

With regard to the labels I would suggest either choosing all UPPERCASE (even for ordinals) or Title Case (Camel case) . Given the flavour of your map I think all uppercase since that was historically used.  That said I much prefer title case for street labels on maps.


co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com


#13
DogwoodGeo

DogwoodGeo

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • United States

Josh, that covered it.  I have really struggled to get shaded reliefs looking the way I like within the ArcGIS stack with regard to shading and base color. I really like yours.  That being said I started on a map of New Mexico for a friend who just moved there.  I'm using QGIS for this one and the "blend" tool made it much easier to work with the gray of the shaded relief to get the final color I wanted. Next week or so I will post examples of it for comments in the map gallery.  

 

Thanks



#14
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,310 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

If you have access to PhotoShop, you can really do a lot with shaded relief beyond what the GIS apps give you natively. The OSU Cartography and Geovisualization Lab also has some great open apps for relief generalization:

 

http://cartography.oregonstate.edu/


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

www.mapbliss.com
@mapbliss

#15
Matthew Hampton

Matthew Hampton

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,408 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Oregon
  • Interests:Playing in the mountains and rivers.
  • United States

DogwoodGeo you are spot on with respect to using QGIS's blending modes with integrating colors with shading. That process incidentally mimics the layer blending options available in Photoshop and Illustrator.

 

I think ESRI's lack of offering layer blending modes in ArcPro is an oversight I wish they would amend.


co-cartographic creator of boringmaps.com





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->