Jump to content

 
Photo

Representing overlapping paths

- - - - - design colors paths trail outdoors

  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1
Luca Moiana

Luca Moiana

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Italy
  • Italy

Representing overlapping paths

Hello everyone,

 

I have to create a map, for a trail running competition, with 4 path overlapping:

7k, 11k, 16k and 20k

Any suggestion for the representation?

Here is the digital version of the map (critiques more then welcome): https://lucamoiana.github.io/MDR2017/

Attached is a draft of the map

 

PLEASE HELP ME !! NO MUCH TIME LEFT

 



#2
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,312 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

Offset paths in different colors for each path? This would be similar to city transit maps with overlapping bus routes. See if you can find any inspirational examples on line.


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

www.mapbliss.com
@mapbliss

#3
Kate Leroux

Kate Leroux

    Key Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 72 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Seattle, WA
  • United States

Here's a nice solution from Gretchen Peterson (using overlapping semi-transparent lines): http://www.petersong...om/#gallery_1-8

 

Or, you can get creative with line offset and line thickness. Here's one I did a couple of years ago where several types of lines overlapped: 

Attached File  3-ClosuresJan2016-final.pdf   386.51KB   129 downloads



#4
tangnar

tangnar

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Carolina
  • Interests:Rivers, Urban Design, Geomorphology, Bicycling, Outdoors
  • United States

I'd say have them offset. Or you could make them slightly transparent so they blend together, making a more saturated line when they overlap. And where they diverge, they just diverge and keep their individual colors. 



#5
Dennis McClendon

Dennis McClendon

    Hall of Fame

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,170 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago
  • Interests:map design, large-scale maps of cities
  • United States

As far as I can tell, this is an unsolved problem with the new model of mapmaking: that cartography is just a matter of displaying highly precise geodata on top of an existing slippy basemap.  I have been thinking about this problem with regard to transport maps for several years, and it's surprising to me how much people whose entire experience with cartography is GIS like to just assume away the problem.

 

It appears to me that the optimal solution is displacement of some of the lines.  Because we want to minimize crossings, that's something that I think is much easier to work out using Illustrator or some similar tool that gives you direct control of the linework.  Once displaced, that imprecise linework can be turned back into geodata using various workflows.  Illustrator linework -->  AutoCAD DXF or DWG --> ArcMap is one such workflow.  MAPublisher offers another.

 

Because such displacement is only appropriate for a particular scale, you won't be able to use the same geodata for all zoom levels.  You can either assume that viewers will only look at the routes at 2 or 3 zoom levels, or you can do displaced linework at several scales and look at the zoom level to decide which one to display.  This probably requires a bit of Javascript programming or a similar approach.

 

Perhaps the simplest solution, though, is just to make the shared route black or gray and have it diverge into colored lines only where the routes differ:

 

0L9R6cf.png


Dennis McClendon, Chicago CartoGraphics
chicagocarto.com

#6
David Medeiros

David Medeiros

    Hall of Fame

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,312 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Redwood City CA
  • Interests:Cartography, wood working, wooden boats, fishing, camping, overland travel, exploring.
  • United States

I'd avoid the use of transparency or overlay here (multiply etc.), it will result in a variety of unique symbol colors for each combination of overlap where as displaced symbols only requires the original set of symbol colors. No need to overcomplicate the color space for simple route info. 

 

@Dennis, completely agree. Many GIS map makers can't separate the data from the representation and don't understand the difference between showing the raw data or communicating its meaning. A map of many overlapping boundaries, where the original data are all from diff sources and so do not fully match but are in reality the same boundary, is a perfect example. If what's relevant is the status of the boundary at various overlaps, then discrepancies in the data should be cleaned up to present a unified symbology, not a mess of varied lines all representing the same thing. 


GIS Reference and Instruction Specialist, Stanford Geospatial Center.

www.mapbliss.com
@mapbliss

#7
Luca Moiana

Luca Moiana

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Italy
  • Italy

Hi,

 

thank you everyone for the great suggestions.

Just to make it clear, I have to print the map on paper 100cmX140cm, the leaflet version was just an example for the paths

I did some test with offset but working only with ArcGIS and QGIS, I have troubles choosing the right offset in order to match lines especially in corners.

I will try some transparency overlap but, being 4 colours, I'm afraid everything get messed up.

I did try some overlapping  https://www.dropbox....qpltv3/test.png and then use distance labels to show the underneath path, but I don't particularly like it.

As for the offset inspired to transportation maps, my problem, beside the graphic problem above mentioned, I still have the problem to cover up streeets names

 

THANKS AGAIN for the great discussion, full of suggestions and inspirational link 



#8
Luca

Luca

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 24 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Luzern
  • Switzerland

Ciao

 

last year we have solved the problem with offset paths (see attachment).

We have used illustrator and created a custom pattern brush.

 

Another possibility might be to combine dashed lines like: -red-yellow-red-yellow-

Attached Thumbnails

  • Verbier_paths.PNG

Mappuls AG | www.mappuls.ch
8°17'50"East / 47°3'2"North


#9
Luca Moiana

Luca Moiana

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Italy
  • Italy

Ciao

 

last year we have solved the problem with offset paths (see attachment).

We have used illustrator and created a custom pattern brush.

 

Another possibility might be to combine dashed lines like: -red-yellow-red-yellow-

Nice, so it looks like I will have to switch to inkscape. 

What was the size of your rapresentation? how think are the lines?

cheers

 

L



#10
tangnar

tangnar

    Master Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 143 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:South Carolina
  • Interests:Rivers, Urban Design, Geomorphology, Bicycling, Outdoors
  • United States

As for the issue of web maps and cartography, I think the use of customized vector tiles will make things much better. If we take this case as an example, you could generate offset lines in GIS for the routes, then merge them into an existing roads dataset (with something like Mapbox Studio). Then could set rules to how the lines are displayed at different scales. 

 

This is a big step, because instead of just throwing data on top of a basemap, you have the opportunity to merge your data into the basemap, alleviating issues of layer order, labeling, etc. 

 

I've done this with the National Hydrography Dataset in Mapbox Studio. The OpenStreetMap hydrography is lacking, so I replaced it with NHD and set it display different widths and at different scales based on zoom level. 



#11
Luca Moiana

Luca Moiana

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 13 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Italy
  • Italy

As for the issue of web maps and cartography, I think the use of customized vector tiles will make things much better. If we take this case as an example, you could generate offset lines in GIS for the routes, then merge them into an existing roads dataset (with something like Mapbox Studio). Then could set rules to how the lines are displayed at different scales. 

 

This is a big step, because instead of just throwing data on top of a basemap, you have the opportunity to merge your data into the basemap, alleviating issues of layer order, labeling, etc. 

 

I've done this with the National Hydrography Dataset in Mapbox Studio. The OpenStreetMap hydrography is lacking, so I replaced it with NHD and set it display different widths and at different scales based on zoom level. 

Hi,

 

as for the webmap you are right, I have to do the big jump on mapbox studio.

But now I'm strugglig with the paper map and offsets



#12
Luca

Luca

    Contributor

  • Validated Member
  • PipPip
  • 24 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Luzern
  • Switzerland

The size of the map is69.9 x 53.4 cm, Scale: 1:25'000.

A single line is 0.7 mm thick, with the white stroke 1 mm.


Mappuls AG | www.mappuls.ch
8°17'50"East / 47°3'2"North






Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: design, colors, paths, trail, outdoors

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

-->